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Trump impeachment: Analysis and news on the House charges and Senate acquittal of the president

The Senate trial on the two articles of impeachment against Trump, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, ended with acquittal on both charges.
Image: Impeachment live blog
Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment of President Donald Trump, stemming from his dealings with Ukraine, moved to the Senate for trial in January after the House voted a month earlier to adopt two articles of impeachment: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The Senate voted in early February to acquit the president on both charges.

Trump's impeachment followed weeks of testimony related to his efforts to press Ukraine for investigations into Democratic rivals and hours of fiery debate over the process.

Trump is only the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. Read all of the breaking news and analysis on impeachment from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

Trump impeachment highlights

Download the NBC News mobile app for the latest news on the impeachment inquiry

Live Blog

Schiff, Jordan react after first public impeachment hearing

Trump said he heard public testimony was 'a joke'

Trump said that although he didn't watch the first open hearing in the House impeachment inquiry Wednesday, he heard it was "a joke" and said he still wanted to learn the identity of the intelligence community whistleblower whose complaint sparked the impeachment investigation.

"I hear it's a joke. I haven't watched, I haven't watched for one minute because I've been with the president which is much more important as far as I am concerned," Trump said, speaking to reporters at the White House alongside Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. "This is a sham, and it shouldn't be allowed."

"I want to find out who is the whistleblower, and because the whistleblower gave a lot of very incorrect information, including my call with the president of Ukraine, which was a perfect call and highly appropriate," Trump added.

Read more here

5 things we learned from George Kent and Bill Taylor's impeachment testimony

Bill Taylor and George Kent, the first two witnesses in the House impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump's dealings in Ukraine, testified for more than five hours Wednesday in a public hearing that saw both men share new — and sometimes shocking — pieces of information.

Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat in Ukraine, and Kent, a deputy assistant secretary of state who worked on Ukraine and five other countries, had previously testified last month, for hours, in a closed-door setting before the three committees leading the inquiry.

Here are five things we learned from their public appearance on Wednesday.

When was military aid for Ukraine released?

The whistleblower complaint, made by a still-anonymous member of the intelligence community about Trump's dealings with Ukraine, made its way to the White House by Sept. 9, Schiff said in his closing remarks. The existence of the complaint also became known to the House Intelligence Committee on that date,  which the White House also learned, Schiff added.  

Military aid for Ukraine was released "less than 48 hours later."

Democrats vote to table motion to subpoena the whistleblower

Bill Taylor departs after giving testimony

Bill Taylor, top diplomat to Ukraine, leaves after giving testimony at an impeachment hearing on Nov. 13, 2019.Jonathan Ernst / Reuters

Trump campaign manager bashes 'unelected, career government bureaucrats'

"The entire world can read the transcript of President Trump’s conversation with President Zelensky, so people don’t need to rely on third-party opinions when they can see the facts for themselves," said Trump 2020 campaign manager Brad Parscale.

He added, "Despite that, today we heard from Democrats’ hand-picked star witnesses, who together were not on the Ukraine phone call, did not speak directly to President Trump, got third-hand hearsay from one side of a different phone call in a restaurant, and formed opinions based on stories in the pages of the New York Times. We hate to break it to these unelected, career government bureaucrats who think they know best: the President of the United States sets foreign policy, not them. And disagreement on policy is not an impeachable offense."