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Trump impeachment: Analysis and news on the House charges and Senate acquittal of the president

The Senate trial on the two articles of impeachment against Trump, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, ended with acquittal on both charges.
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Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The fast-moving impeachment of President Donald Trump, stemming from his dealings with Ukraine, moved to the Senate for trial in January after the House voted a month earlier to adopt two articles of impeachment: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The Senate voted in early February to acquit the president on both charges.

Trump's impeachment followed weeks of testimony related to his efforts to press Ukraine for investigations into Democratic rivals and hours of fiery debate over the process.

Trump is only the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. Read all of the breaking news and analysis on impeachment from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

Trump impeachment highlights

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Live Blog

Rep. Khanna: Trump Iran actions could be 'another impeachable offense'

Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., a member of the House Committee on Armed Services, spoke to MSNBC on Monday and discussed the war powers resolution that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., announced she would introduce to the House days amid escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran.

Khanna described the Trump administration’s strike last week on Gen. Qasem Soleimani as "unconstitutional," and said Congress needs to "reassert" its role by passing the resolution. He expressed confidence that the vote to pass the resolution would be bipartisan. Khanna said the president would violate the Constitution if he disregards the resolution should it be passed, adding that doing so would be "frankly another impeachable offense."

 Khanna said that adding that offense to the articles of impeachment is an option that is "definitely on the table." "It should be scary to people what this president is doing," Khanna said. "No regard for the decision-making process, no consultation with Congress. This is exactly what the framers intended the impeachment power to be used for.”  When asked about Trump’s tweet that he would use Twitter to notify Congress of his courses of action, Khanna said "it's not just that he has to notify Congress. He has to get Congress' approval."

Bolton willing to testify in Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed

WASHINGTON — Former national security adviser John Bolton says he is now willing to testify in the Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed.

In a statement obtained by NBC News, Bolton writes, "I have concluded that, if the Senate issues a subpoena for my testimony, I am prepared to testify."

Bolton had a front-row seat to the White House’s pressure campaign against Ukraine to investigate the son of Trump’s political rival, Joe Biden, including the decision to withhold military aid from Ukraine. He served as Trump’s national security adviser for more than a year, until his departure in September just a couple of weeks before the Ukraine pressure effort became public.

Bolton has previously said he would not testify before the House Intelligence Committee during its impeachment investigation unless he was subpoenaed and a judge ordered him to defy the White House by appearing before Congress.

Read more here.

Trump: Impeachment 'is a con game by the Dems to help with the election'

Graham threatens to 'take matters in our own hands' if Pelosi doesn't send impeachment articles

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said Sunday that if the House doesn't submit articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the Senate this week, he will seek to change the impeachment rules so the Senate can proceed to a trial without them.

Speaking on Fox News' "Sunday Morning Futures," Graham said: "If we don't get the articles this week, then we need to take matters in our own hands and change the rules."

"Deem them to be delivered to the Senate," he continued, adding, "My goal is to start this trial in the next coming days, not let [House Speaker] Nancy Pelosi take over the Senate."

Read the full story.

Trump's trial: Lawmakers return to D.C., and here's where things stand

Lawmakers return to Washington on Monday after the holiday break — and will walk right into the face-off over President Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

The House voted to impeach Trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Dec. 18, making him just the third president in U.S. history to be impeached.

But House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has not yet named the case managers — essentially the members of Congress who act as prosecutors during a trial in the Senate — nor has she sent the two articles of impeachment to the Senate. The president's trial cannot get underway until she does.

Pelosi said she first wants assurances of a fair trial, and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., is demanding that witnesses be allowed to testify. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said he wants the issue of witnesses to be decided not now but later in the trial process, as it was during Bill Clinton's impeachment trial in 1999.

Here's where things stand and how they're likely to proceed.

OPINION: Rep. Swalwell on America's first presidential bribery scandal

As we debated the impeachment of President Donald Trump, my House Democratic colleagues and I often underscored the unprecedented nature of the president's actions toward Ukraine. But, while it is true that no other American president has attempted to bribe another world leader for help in a domestic political fight, the circumstances are not wholly without precedent in our nation's history.

It's just that, at that particular moment in history, we were the fledgling democracy desperately in need of assistance from a world power, and it was another nation's politician who attempted to secure a bribe from us. Astute students of history will remember it was known as the XYZ Affair, and that it was America’s first international scandal.

Read more here.

Dems say no rush to turn over articles of impeachment, but wait won't be 'indefinite'

As Congress prepares to return amid a weeks-long impasse over the next steps in President Donald Trump's impeachment, Democrats said Sunday there is no rush to turn over the two House-passed articles of impeachment to the Senate but that the holdout would not be "indefinite."

"I don't think it's going to be indefinite, no," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., told CNN's "State of the Union." "I don't think that's at all the desire, motivation here. The desire is to get a commitment from the Senate that they're going to have a fair trial, fair to the president, yes, but fair to the American people."

Read more here.

Warren questions Iran attack timing with impeachment trial looming

WASHINGTON — Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Sunday raised the prospect that President Trump's decision to authorize last week's attack on a top Iranian general may have been linked to the pending impeachment trial in the Senate.

"Next week, Donald Trump faces the start, potentially, of an impeachment trial," the Democratic presidential candidate said in an interview with "Meet the Press."

"People are starting to ask, why now did he do this? Why not delay? And why this one is so dangerous is that he is truly taking us right to the edge of war. And that is something that puts us at risk, it puts the Middle East at risk, it puts the entire world at risk."

Read more here.