Trump says he will 'strongly consider' testifying in House impeachment probe

"Even though I did nothing wrong ... I like the idea & will, in order to get Congress focused again, strongly consider it!" Trump tweeted.
Image: President Donald Trump speaks to the media on the South Lawn of the White House on Nov. 9, 2019.
President Trump, shown Nov. 9, said Monday that he was "strongly" considering testifying before the House impeachment inquiry, "even though I did nothing wrong." Yuri Gripas / Reuters file

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By Allan Smith

President Donald Trump said Monday that he is "strongly" considering testifying before the impeachment probe in light of recent comments from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., who said he is more than welcome to present his case personally before the House Intelligence Committee.

"Our Crazy, Do Nothing (where’s USMCA, infrastructure, lower drug pricing & much more?) Speaker of the House, Nervous Nancy Pelosi, who is petrified by her Radical Left knowing she will soon be gone (they & Fake News Media are her BOSS), suggested on Sunday’s DEFACE THE NATION that I testify about the phony Impeachment Witch Hunt," Trump tweeted. "She also said I could do it in writing. Even though I did nothing wrong, and don’t like giving credibility to this No Due Process Hoax, I like the idea & will, in order to get Congress focused again, strongly consider it!"

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Speaking with CBS's "Face the Nation" in an interview that aired Sunday, Pelosi said Trump can "come right before the committee and talk, speak all the truth that he wants, if he wants to take the oath of office, or he could do it in writing."

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"He has every opportunity to present his case," she said, adding that if Trump "has information that is exculpatory, that means ex, taking away, culpable, blame, then we look forward to seeing it.”

But Pelosi, calling Trump's efforts at having Ukraine investigate the Bidens and a debunked conspiracy theory about the 2016 presidential election, said the president's conduct "was so much worse than even what Richard Nixon did."

"At some point, Richard Nixon cared about the country enough to recognize that this could not continue," she said.

Public calls for the president to testify before the committee have ramped up recently. After an extended rant during Wednesday's public impeachment hearings from Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, in which the Trump ally said investigators need to have “the person who started” the probe, meaning the first whistleblower, come testify, Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., retorted, "I'd like to see the person who started it come testify. President Trump is welcome to take a seat right there."

Speaking with Fox News on Monday, Rep. Lee Zeldin, R-N.Y., one of Trump's top allies in battling impeachment, said his advice to the president on testifying before impeachment investigators would be "heck no."

Earlier this month, Trump decried the idea of the whistleblower providing written answers to Congress, saying they would be "not acceptable." Trump refused to supply former special counsel Robert Mueller with live testimony, instead opting to provide written answers to a series of questions related to Russian electoral interference. In his more than 400-page report, Mueller said those written answers were "inadequate."