Judge Tosses Copyright Infringement Case Against Jay Z's 'Big Pimpin'

by Erik Ortiz and The Associated Press /  / Updated 
Image: Rapper Jay Z leaves a United States District Court after opening statements and jury selection in downtown Los Angeles
Rapper Jay Z leaves a United States District Court after opening statements and jury selection in downtown Los Angeles, California October 13, 2015.MARIO ANZUONI / Reuters

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Jay Z has one less problem after a Los Angeles judge dismissed a copyright Infringement case over his 2000 chart topper "Big Pimpin'."

Image: Rapper Jay Z leaves a United States District Court after opening statements and jury selection in downtown Los Angeles
Rapper Jay Z leaves a United States District Court after opening statements and jury selection in downtown Los Angeles, California October 13, 2015.MARIO ANZUONI / Reuters

U.S. District Court Judge Christina Snyder ruled Wednesday against the heir of a late Egyptian composer, saying he didn't have the right to pursue a copyright infringement claim and the case should be tossed out.

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The nephew of Baligh Hamdi — an Egyptian composer whose 1957 song, "Khosara Khosara," is partially used in "Big Pimpin'" — sued Jay Z and producer Tim "Timbaland" Mosley.

Notes from a flute from Hamdi's song is sampled in the track — a top 20 Billboard hit for Jay Z off his 1999 album, "Vol. 3 ... Life and Times of S. Carter."

The abrupt end to the case came after the rapper, whose real name is Shawn Carter, and Timbaland testified last week about creating the song and their belief that they had valid rights to use the Egyptian music.

"We and our clients obviously are very pleased with this decision," attorney Christine Lepera, who is representing Timbaland and others, said in a statement.

But Pete Ross, a lawyer for Hamdi's nephew, Osama Ahmed Fahmy, told The Associated Press that he will appeal the judge's ruling, which has prevented it from going to a jury. Ross called the decision "completely wrong."

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