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Climate Agreement Reached in Peru After Marathon U.N. Session

 / Updated 
Image: Activists perform as heads of state during the Climate Change Conference COP20 in Lima Peru
Activists perform as heads of state, from left, President Barack Obama, Australia's Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Canada's Prime Minister Stephen Harper, China's President Xi Jinping, India's Narendra Modi, Russia's President Vladimir Putin and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during the Climate Change Conference COP20 in Lima Peru, Friday, Dec. 12, 2014. The boat's sign reads in Spanish "Leave behind emissions. Climatic agreement." Delegates from more than 190 countries are meeting in Lima to work on drafts for a global climate deal that is supposed to be adopted next year in Paris. Martin Mejia / AP

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Negotiators have reached a watered-down deal at U.N. talks in Peru that sets the stage for a global climate pact in Paris next year. The Lima agreement was adopted hours after a previous draft was rejected by developing countries who accused rich nations of shirking their responsibilities to fight global warming and pay for its impacts. Peru's environment minister presented a new, fourth draft just before midnight and said he hoped it would satisfy all parties, giving a sharply reduced body of remaining delegates an hour to review it.

"As a text it's not perfect, but it includes the positions of the parties," said the minister, Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, who was the conference chair and had spent all afternoon and evening meeting separately with delegations.

The main goal for the two-week session in Lima was relatively modest: Reach agreement on what information should go into the pledges that countries submit for a global climate pact expected to be adopted next year in Paris. But even that became complicated as several developing nations rebelled against a draft decision they said blurred the distinction between what rich and poor countries can be expected to do. The final draft apparently alleviated those concerns with language saying countries have "common but differentiated responsibilities" to deal with global warming.

IN-DEPTH

— The Associated Press

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