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CERN Particle Smasher to Turn Back On at Record Power in March

Scientists find ‘God Particle’ 0:22

CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be turned back on in March and a few weeks later will start smashing sub-atomic particles together again at nearly double its previous power, helping scientists hunt for clues about the universe. The world's biggest particle collider, located near Geneva, has been undergoing a two-year refit and work is now "in full swing" to start circulating proton beams again in March, with the first collisions due by May, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) said on Friday. "With this new energy level, the (collider) will open new horizons for physics and for future discoveries," CERN Director General Rolf Heuer said in a statement. "I’m looking forward to seeing what nature has in store for us." CERN's collider is buried in a 27-km (17-mile) tunnel straddling the Franco-Swiss border at the foot of the Jura mountains. The entire machine is already almost cooled to 1.9 degrees above absolute zero in preparation for the next three-year run. The first run, carried out at lower power, led in 2012 to confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson particle, which explains how fundamental matter took on the mass to form stars and planets. That discovery was a landmark in physics but there are still plenty of other mysteries to be unraveled, including the nature of "dark matter" and "dark energy."

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--- Reuters