Lost 'City of the Monkey God' Discovered in Honduras

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A “were-jaguar” effigy, likely representing a combination of a human and spirit animal, is part of a still-buried ceremonial seat, or metate, one of many artifacts discovered in a cache in ruins deep in the Honduran jungle.
A “were-jaguar” effigy, likely representing a combination of a human and spirit animal, is part of a still-buried ceremonial seat, or metate, one of many artifacts discovered in a cache in ruins deep in the Honduran jungle. Dave Yoder / National Geographic

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A National Geographic expedition has just returned from the jungles of Honduras, where they've confirmed the discovery of a lost city that belonged to a mysterious and virtually unknown civilization. The culture vanished suddenly a thousand years ago and archaeologists have yet to name it.

An article published on NationalGeographic.com tells the story of the legendary city sometimes referred to as the “City of the Monkey God":

For a hundred years, explorers and prospectors told tales of the white ramparts of a lost city glimpsed above the jungle foliage. Indigenous stories speak of a “white house” or a “place of cacao” where Indians took refuge from Spanish conquistadores—a mystical, Eden-like paradise from which no one ever returned.

Since the 1920s, several expeditions had searched for the White City, or Ciudad Blanca. The eccentric explorer Theodore Morde mounted the most famous of these in 1940, under the aegis of the Museum of the American Indian (now part of the Smithsonian Institution).

Morde returned from Mosquitia with thousands of artifacts, claiming to have entered the City. According to Morde, the indigenous people there said it contained a giant, buried statue of a monkey god. He refused to divulge the location out of fear, he said, that the site would be looted. He later committed suicide and his site—if it existed at all—was never identified.

Read the full story at National Geographic
Trees are still thick within a pocket of jungle in the Mosquitia that is home to the ruins of an ancient civilization that were neighbors to the Maya.
Trees are still thick within a pocket of jungle in the Mosquitia that is home to the ruins of an ancient civilization that were neighbors to the Maya.Dave Yoder / National Geographic

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