Feedback
Science
photo

Rare Ancient Chinese Bronzes Go on Display in US

Image: Bronze Mask at Bowers Museum
Wei Xi Wu, of China, watches as "Mask with Protruding Eyes," is unloaded at the Bowers Museum, in Santa Ana, Calif on Oct.9. "China's Lost Civilization: The Mystery of Sanxingdui" includes more than 100 ancient pieces, some never seen outside China. The exhibit will remain at the Bowers until March 15, 2015, after which they will move to Houston's Museum of Natural Science. Chris Carlson / AP

When the mysterious people of China's Sanxingdui packed up and moved away 3,000 years ago, they left behind no written language and no indication of who they were, where they were going or why. What they did leave was a gigantic cache of intricately fabricated, larger-than-life bronze art works — each created at a time during which historians doubted technology even existed to make a bronze on such a grand scale. They also left several dozen elephant tusks, in an area where elephants were not believed to have been introduced yet. For whatever reason these objects were made and then discarded, they themselves are moving now, just as their creators did three millennia ago, and will go on display Sunday at Southern California's Bowers Museum, the first stop on a rare U.S. tour. "China's Lost Civilization: The Mystery of Sanxingdui" includes more than 100 ancient pieces, some never seen outside China. The exhibit will remain at the Bowers until March 15, after which they will move to Houston's Museum of Natural Science.

--- Associated Press