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For $265, Here's How to Survive a Plane Crash

The half-day safety course, now open to frequent fliers, encourages passengers to be aware of their surroundings and familiarize themselves with what happens in an emergency.

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British Airways flight safety instructor Diane Pashley demonstrates the use of an oxygen mask during a British Airways flight safety course at the airline's Cranebank training facility, near Heathrow airport in London, on Sept. 10, 2014. The half-day safety course, now open to frequent fliers willing to pay $265, encourages passengers to be aware of their surroundings and familiarize themselves with what happens in an emergency.

Images made available on Wednesday.

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Patricipants enter a cabin simulator during a British Airways flight safety course at the airline's Cranebank training facility. Participants learn the best way to brace for a crash, how to open aircraft doors and why to wait until exiting a plane to inflate life vests.

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British Airways flight safety instructor Andy Clubb, center, instructs participants as theatrical smoke fills the cabin simulator. The course started as a training exercise for oil company employees who routinely flew to remote locations, but is now open to frequent fliers, although most participants are still sent by their companies. There are up to three classes a week.

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British Airways flight safety instructor Diane Pashley teaches participants how to open one of the aircraft doors onboard a cabin simulator.

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Participants learn how to assume the brace position in a cabin simulator. "The likelihood is that you are never going to have to do it in a real life situation. But knowing now that you could do it, just gives you a bit more confidence," says participant Sarah Barnett, who frequently flies in her job marketing vacation destinations.

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A participant slides down an escape slide.

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Flight safety instructor Andy Clubb shines flashlights as he walks through a cabin simulator filled with theatrical smoke. British Airways hopes the more than 15,000 people who have taken the training since 2004 can act as leaders for others to follow in a crash. Some passengers freeze or melt down in an emergency. If they see someone quickly, calmly and confidently following a flight attendant's instructions to evacuate, they might do the same.

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