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Flander's Field: Ceramic Poppies Planted to Honor WWI Veterans

11 PHOTOS

Servicemen and dignitaries stand amongst the ceramic poppies that form part of the art installation "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red", during an Armistice Day ceremony at the Tower of London in London November 11, 2014. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY CONFLICT ANNIVERSARY)
Stefan Wermuth / X90073
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Cadet Harry Alexander Hayes,13, salutes after planting the final ceramic poppy at the art installation "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red", during Armistice Day at the Tower of London in London November 11, 2014. The art installation was completed on Tuesday when the 888,246th poppy was planted. Each poppy represents a soldier killed during the First World War. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth (BRITAIN - Tags: ANNIVERSARY MILITARY CONFLICT)
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The near completed ceramic poppy art installation by artist Paul Cummins entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' is seen lit up before sunrise in the dry moat of the Tower of London in London, Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014. The finished installation will be made up of 888,246 ceramic poppies, with the final poppy being placed on Armistice Day today. Each poppy represents a British and Commonwealth military fatality from World War I. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Matt Dunham / AP
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A picture shows ceramic poppies lined up on a wall ready to be planted in the "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" installation by ceramic artist Paul Cummins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War, in the moat area of the Tower of London in London on November 10, 2014. Designed as a tribute to Britain's World War I dead, a blood-red trench of ceramic poppies around the Tower of London has become a national phenomenon as Britons flock to remember the fallen in generations of war. When the final poppy is planted on November 11, Armistice Day, the installation will consist of over 800,000 ceramic poppies, each one symbolising a British and Commonwealth military fatalities in WW1. AFP PHOTO/ANDREW COWIE -- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE, MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION, TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTIONANDREW COWIE/AFP/Getty Images
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A photograph of a soldier is seen placed on a fence near an art installation, on Remembrance Sunday, at the Tower of London November 9, 2014. The installation of over 888,000 red ceramic poppies was created by artist Paul Cummins, each poppy representing a British or colonial fatality during World War One. REUTERS/Neil Hall (BRITAIN - Tags: CONFLICT POLITICS ANNIVERSARY SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
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Visitors photograph the "'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" as the art installation is illuminated at the Tower of London November 9, 2014. The installation of over 888,000 red ceramic poppies was created by artist Paul Cummins, each poppy representing a British or colonial fatality during World War One. REUTERS/Neil Hall (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ANNIVERSARY CONFLICT)
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LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 07: Visitors view the 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' installation at the Tower of London on November 7, 2014 in London, England. The installation by artists Paul Cummins and Tom Piper will eventually consist of 888,246 ceramic poppies - representing each of the commonwealth servicemen and women killed in the first world war. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Dan Kitwood / Getty Images Europe
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Sergeant James Hunter and Captain Kelly Richards plant ceramic poppies amongst other poppies that form part of the art installation called "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" at the Tower of London October 9, 2014. The evolving art installation, which will be completed on November 11, will create a commemoration for the centenary of World War One. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAINMILITARY ANNIVERSARY TRAVEL - Tags: MILITARY SOCIETY TRAVEL) ANNIVERSARY
Luke Macgregor / X01981
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REFILE - CLARIFYING CAPTION Chelsea Pensioner Albert Willis plants a ceramic poppy amongst other poppies that form part of the art installation called "Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red" at the Tower of London October 9, 2014. The evolving art installation, which will be completed on November 11, will create a commemoration for the centenary of World War One. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor (BRITAIN - Tags: MILITARY SOCIETY TRAVEL ANNIVERSARY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)
Luke Macgregor / X01981
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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - AUGUST 05: Catherine, The Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry visit The Tower of London's 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' ceramic poppy installation by artist Paul Cummins, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of First World War on August 5, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by John Stillwell/WPA Pool/Getty Images)
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The sea of poppies around the Tower of London at the opening of the Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red artwork by Paul Cummins Opening of Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London, Britain - 05 Aug 2014 888,246 ceramic poppies, each poppy representing a British or Colonial military fatality during the war, will fill the moat by November 11th. For the opening, battlefield images were projected onto the central tower while Tim Pigott-Smith read out names of the fallen during a 21 gun salute. The evening ended with the playing of the last post. Silhouettes projected onto the tower were by wartime silhouette artist Captain H.L. Oakley and were supplied from the wartime editions of the Illustrated London News by Mary Evans Picture Library. Poppies can be purchased from the Tower of London at www.poppies.hrp.org.uk/buy-a-poppy/ (Rex Features via AP Images)
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