Inside small experiments on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) provides low-energy antiprotons mainly for studies of antimatter. Previously, ?antiparticle factories? at CERN and elsewhere consisted of chains of accelerators, each performing one of the steps needed to provide antiparticles for experiments. Now the AD performs all the tasks alone, from making antiprotons to delivering them to the experiments.

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Inside CERN's Large Hadron Collider

Take a look behind the scenes at Europe's CERN particle physics lab, where scientists used the Large Hadron Collider to detect the Higgs boson.

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The Main Workshop building of CERN institute is one of the most important piece of CERN. It is the house of every experimental pieces used by the huge community of scientists working with the LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

Scientists at the CERN particle physics center at the French-Swiss borders are preparing to restart the Large Hadron Collider, (LHC), the world's most powerful particle-smasher. Photographer Luca Locatelli was given acces to maintenance work in November, providing a unique view into this vast underground laboratory. Engineers work on equipment for the LHC in the main workshop at CERN shown here.

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A model of theThe Large Hadron Collider (LHC) displayed inside LHC Magnet facility building where the  the world?s largest and most powerful particle accelerator are built. The LHC It first started up on 10 September 2008, and remains the latest addition to CERN?s accelerator complex. The LHC consists of a 27-kilometre ring of superconducting magnets with a number of accelerating structures to boost the energy of the particles along the way.
Inside the accelerator, two high-energy particle beams travel at close to the speed of light before they are made to collide. The beams travel in opposite directions in separate beam pipes ? two tubes kept at ultrahigh vacuum. They are guided around the accelerator ring by a strong magnetic field maintained by superconducting electromagnets. The electromagnets are built from coils of special electric cable that operates in a superconducting state, efficiently conducting electricity without resistance or loss of energy. This requires chilling the magnets to ?271.3°C ? a temperature colder than outer space. For this reason, much of the accelerator is connected to a distribution system of liquid helium, which cools the magnets, as well as to other supply services. LHC Magnet facility

A model of the Large Hadron Collider is displayed inside the LHC Magnet facility building, where components for the particle accelerator are built. The LHC was first started up in 2008 and is resuming high-energy collisions in March.

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Underground Tunnel inside the ATLAS experiment.
ATLAS  is one of two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It investigates a wide range of physics, from the search for the Higgs boson to extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter.
Beams of particles from the LHC collide at the centre of the ATLAS detector making collision debris in the form of new particles, which fly out from the collision point in all directions. Six different detecting subsystems arranged in layers around the collision point record the paths, momentum, and energy of the particles, allowing them to be individually identified. A huge magnet system bends the paths of charged particles so that their momenta can be measured.
The interactions in the ATLAS detectors create an enormous flow of data. To digest the data, ATLAS uses an advanced ?trigger? system to tell the detector which events to record and which to ignore. Complex data-acquisition and computing systems are then used to analyse the collision events recorded. At 46 m long, 25 m high and 25 m wide, the 7000-tonne ATLAS detector is the largest volume particle detector ever constructed. It sits in a cavern 100 m below ground near the main CERN site, close to the village of Meyrin in Switzerland.
More than 3000 scientists from 174 institutes in 38 countries work on the ATLAS experiment.

The LHC's 17-mile-round underground tunnel directs particles through ATLAS, one of the facility's two general-purpose detectors. ATLAS and the other detector, the Compact Muon Solenoid, probe a wide range of scientific mysteries, from the successful search for the Higgs boson to the hunt for extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter.

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A scientist inside one fo the underground room of  Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). 
The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving 4300 particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from 182 institutes in 42 countries.It is designed to investigate a wide range of physics, including the search for the Higgs boson, extra dimensions, and particles that could make up dark matter. Although it has the same scientific goals as the ATLAS experiment, it uses different technical solutions and a different magnet-system design.

A scientist works inside one of the underground rooms of the Compact Muon Solenoid, another of LHC's general-purpose detectors. The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving 4,300 particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from 182 institutes in 42 countries.

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Last maintenance work inside The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is designed to investigate a wide range of physics, including the search for the Higgs boson, extra dimensions, and particles that could make up dark matter. Although it has the same scientific goals as the ATLAS experiment, it uses different technical solutions and a different magnet-system design.
The CMS detector is built around a huge solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 4 tesla, about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. The field is confined by a steel ?yoke? that forms the bulk of the detector?s 12,500-tonne weight.
An unusual feature of the CMS detector is that instead of being built in-situ like the other giant detectors of the LHC experiments, it was constructed in 15 sections at ground level before being lowered into an underground cavern near Cessy in France and reassembled. The complete detector is 21 metres long, 15 metres wide and 15 metres high.
The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving 4300 particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from 182 institutes in 42 countries (February 2014). 

CERN Director General, Rolf Heuer, and the Chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, Ansar Parvez, signed today in Islamabad, in presence of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, a document admitting the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to CERN Associate Membership, subject to ratification by the Government of Pakistan.

Maintenance work continues inside the CMS. The CMS detector is built around a huge solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 4 tesla, about 100,000 times the strength of Earth's magnetic field.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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Last maintenance work inside The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It is designed to investigate a wide range of physics, including the search for the Higgs boson, extra dimensions, and particles that could make up dark matter. Although it has the same scientific goals as the ATLAS experiment, it uses different technical solutions and a different magnet-system design.
The CMS detector is built around a huge solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 4 tesla, about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. The field is confined by a steel ?yoke? that forms the bulk of the detector?s 12,500-tonne weight.
An unusual feature of the CMS detector is that instead of being built in-situ like the other giant detectors of the LHC experiments, it was constructed in 15 sections at ground level before being lowered into an underground cavern near Cessy in France and reassembled. The complete detector is 21 metres long, 15 metres wide and 15 metres high.
The CMS experiment is one of the largest international scientific collaborations in history, involving 4300 particle physicists, engineers, technicians, students and support staff from 182 institutes in 42 countries (February 2014).

A unusual feature of the CMS detector is that instead of being built in place like the LHC's other detectors, it was constructed in 15 sections at ground level before being lowered into an underground cavern and assembled. The complete detector is 70 feet long, 50 feet wide and 50 feet high (21 by 15 by 15 meters).

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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Last maintenance work inside the ALICE experiment. before running again in 2015 after a 2-year technical stop of the LHC.  The ALICE collaboration uses the 10,000-tonne ALICE detector ? 26 m long, 16 m high, and 16 m wide ? to study quark-gluon plasma. ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring. It is designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, where a phase of matter called quark-gluon plasma forms. The detector sits in a vast cavern 56 m below ground close to the village of St Genis-Pouilly in France, receiving beams from the LHC.
The collaboration counts more than 1000 scientists from over 100 physics institutes in 30 countries.

The last bit of maintenance work is perfomed inside the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) before it resumes operation in 2015. ALICE is a heavy-ion detector that's designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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Last maintenance work inside the ALICE experiment. before running again in 2015 after a 2-year technical stop of the LHC.  The ALICE collaboration uses the 10,000-tonne ALICE detector ? 26 m long, 16 m high, and 16 m wide ? to study quark-gluon plasma. ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring. It is designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, where a phase of matter called quark-gluon plasma forms. The detector sits in a vast cavern 56 m below ground close to the village of St Genis-Pouilly in France, receiving beams from the LHC.
The collaboration counts more than 1000 scientists from over 100 physics institutes in 30 countries.

The ALICE detector sits in a vast cavern almost 200 feet (56 meters) below ground, close to the village of St Genis-Pouilly in France. When ALICE is in operation, the engineers in charge of the LHC switch from using beams of protons to beams of lead ions.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a heavy-ion detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring. It is designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter at extreme energy densities, where a phase of matter called quark-gluon plasma forms. The collaboration counts more than 1000 scientists from over 100 physics institutes in 30 countries.

The ALICE collaboration uses a 10,000-ton detector – 85 feet long, 50 feet high and 50 feet wide (26 by 16 by 16 meters) – to study quark-gluon plasma, the "Big Bang soup" that existed when the universe was a trillionth of a second old.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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CERN is not made only of the well know experiments of ATLAS, CMS, etc. A huge numbers of small experiments with a vast amount of potential are running inside the CERN village

In addition to the experiments at the LHC, scientists at the CERN particle physics center conduct huge numbers of smaller experiments. A bird's-eye view shows one of the experiments in progress.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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Inside small experiments on the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) provides low-energy antiprotons mainly for studies of antimatter. Previously, ?antiparticle factories? at CERN and elsewhere consisted of chains of accelerators, each performing one of the steps needed to provide antiparticles for experiments. Now the AD performs all the tasks alone, from making antiprotons to delivering them to the experiments.

The Antiproton Decelerator provides low-energy antiprotons, mainly for studies of antimatter. Previously, "antiparticle factories" at CERN and elsewhere consisted of chains of accelerators, each performing one of the steps needed to provide antiparticles for experiments. Now the Antiproton Decelerator performs all the necessary steps, from making the antiprotons to delivering them to experiments. At CERN, scientists have used the antiprotons to create atoms of antihydrogen for a fraction of a second.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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The ATLAS detector is 46 m long, 25 m high and 25 m wide, the 7000-tonne ATLAS detector is the largest volume particle detector ever constructed and it is one of two general-purpose detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It investigates a wide range of physics, from the search for the Higgs boson to extra dimensions and particles that could make up dark matter.
Beams of particles from the LHC collide at the centre of the ATLAS detector making collision debris in the form of new particles, which fly out from the collision point in all directions. Six different detecting subsystems arranged in layers around the collision point record the paths, momentum, and energy of the particles, allowing them to be individually identified. A huge magnet system bends the paths of charged particles so that their momenta can be measured.
The interactions in the ATLAS detectors create an enormous flow of data. To digest the data, ATLAS uses an advanced ?trigger? system to tell the detector which events to record and which to ignore. Complex data-acquisition and computing systems are then used to analyse the collision events recorded. . It sits in a cavern 100 m below ground near the main CERN site, close to the village of Meyrin in Switzerland.
More than 3000 scientists from 174 institutes in 38 countries work on the ATLAS experiment.

The 7,000-ton ATLAS detector is the largest particle detector ever constructed in terms of volume. ATLAS and the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, were instrumental in the successful search for the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider.

Luca Locatelli / INSTITUTE
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