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Modern Day Adventurers Explore Venezuela’s ‘Lost World’

A mysterious mountain on the Venezuela-Brazil border that inspired the "The Lost World" novel is attracting thousands of tourists every year.

A mysterious table-topped mountain on the Venezuela-Brazil border that perplexed 19th century explorers and inspired "The Lost World" novel is attracting modern-day adventurers. Once impenetrable to all but the local Pemon indigenous people, the six-day hike across Venezuela's savannah, through rivers, and up a narrow path that scales Mount Roraima's nearly 2,000-foot cliff faces attracts several thousand trekkers a year.

In the photo above, Pemon indigenous porters walk on the road to Mount Roraima.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433

Japanese tourists walk down from the top of Mount Roraima on Jan. 18.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433

Tourists bathe in a river at the top of Mount Roraima on Jan. 15.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433

Mount Kukenan and Mount Roraima tower over the Tec Camp on Jan. 14. While expeditions help Venezuela’s tourism industry and bring revenue to local communities, they also scatter the prehistoric landscape with unwanted litter.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433

Pemon indigenous porters cover themselves from the rain with plastic bags on top of Mount Roraima, on Jan. 16.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433

Tourists walk down from the top of Mount Roraima on Jan. 18.

Carlos Garcia Rawlins / X02433