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Newsweek’s most iconic covers

A look back at some of the most memorable Newsweek covers from the past 80 years. The weekly magazine is going completely digital, and as of 2013 will no longer produce printed issues.

Newsweek's first issue, dated Feb. 17. 1933. For eight decades, the weekly magazine has been a staple on newsstands. But in 2013, Newsweek's print version is going away. It will, however, continue to live on the web. Here's a look back at some of the magazine's most memorable covers.

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The renown physicist Albert Einstein who developed the theory of relativity is shown on this April 4, 1938 cover.

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This cover, dated Dec. 8, 1941, was published before the Pearl Harbor attacks, and took a closer look at the Japanese Army.

In this Jan. 21, 1963 issue, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Walter Lippmann’s tribute to President John F. Kennedy, who was assassinated in November 1963.

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A special July 29, 1963 issue published by Newsweek, included statistical analysis of racial attitudes, photo essays, and profiles on leaders.

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A June 13, 1966 cover posed what was clearly considered a newsworthy question, “What role for the educated woman?” Sophomore Jamie Rosenthal of Radcliffe was quoted: “I think I’m bright, but I’m more delighted when I can be outbrighted than be brighter than someone else -- particularly if it’s a man.”

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Beatlemania began during February when the Beatles made their debut on the Ed Sullivan show. This Feb. 24, 1964 article refers to John, Paul, George and Ringo as having “great pudding bowls of hair.”

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Newsweek's Aug. 11, 1969 cover displayed a photo of the second man on the moon, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin, standing on the surface of the moon.

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The sudden volley of rifle fire by National Guard troops that killed four Kent State students and wounded 10 others shocked the nation, the raw emotion captured in this May 18, 1970 cover.

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Newsweek explores the women's movement gone mainstream in this March 23, 1970 issue. From the editor’s note: “A new specter is haunting America—the specter of militant feminism. Convinced they have little to lose but their domestic chains, growing numbers of women are challenging the basic assumptions of what they consider a male-dominated society. They demand equal rights in every area from wages through child-rearing to sexual expression."

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Newsweek's Nov. 6, 1972 cover: 'Good-bye Vietnam'

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Newsweek examined the Nixon tapes: more than 2,600 hours of conversations conducted from 1971 through 1973 in the July 30, 1973 issue.

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John Lennon's death is immortalized in a striking black and white photo on the Dec. 22, 1980 cover.

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Newsweek published the photos of hundreds of people who had died of AIDS in a 12-month period in this powerful Aug. 10, 1987 issue.

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In this June 12, 1989 issue, a powerful image of the bloody Tiennamen Square Massacre on June 4.

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The magazine chose a dramatic headline for its June 27, 1994 O.J. Simpson cover. The cover was quickly compared with that of TIME magazine, which used the same photo. TIME's cover picture, however, looked much darker.

On Sept. 24, 2001, the magazine displayed the iconic 9/11 photo of firefighters Daniel "Danny" McWilliams, George Johnson, and William "Billy" Eisengrein.

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In the Nov. 8, 2004 cover, Newsweek focused on the Iraq War, challenging both George Bush and John Kerry's suggestion that America could win the war by training Iraqis to maintain order.

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A Nov. 23, 2009 Newsweek issue became the subject of controversy after Sarah Palin objected to her portrayal on the magazine's cover, calling it "sexist."

NEWSWEEK

An ominous image of Osama bin Laden shown on this May 16, 2011 Newsweek cover asks "Mission Accomplished: But are we any safer?" 10 years after the 9/11 attacks.

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Princess Diana has returned from the grave on the front cover of this July 2011 Newsweek cover in a picture that imagines her, and her life, as it might have been had she lived to mark her 50th birthday.

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