Image:

U.S. news

Trick-or-treat ... from a car seat

With health guideline recommendations against trick-or-treating in Los Angeles County to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, families are turning to Halloween drive-thrus where costumed and masked actors entertain from at least 6-feet away.

/ 17 PHOTOS
Image:

Cars drive through the pumpkin tunnel at Haunt O'Ween in Woodland Hills, Calif., on Oct. 15, 2020.

Los Angeles tried banning trick-or-treating this year and putting the kibosh on Halloween parties and carnivals and haunted houses, as well. But it changed course after a public outcry, and the new guidance says going door to door is "not recommended" as "it can be very difficult to maintain proper social distancing" and "because sharing food is risky."

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A baby in an Elmo costume looks at the Halloween-themed houses at Haunt O'Ween.

According to Los Angeles county, online parties or contests, such as pumpkin-carving or costume contests, are allowed, as are car parades and drive-thru attractions. Drive-thru events can also include distribution of "treat bags," but they are limited to "commercially packaged non-perishable treats,'' and recipients must remain in their vehicles.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A Haunt O'ween actor pours individually-wrapped candy into a child's bag using a basket with a long handle to maintain social distancing at Haunt O'ween.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

Vistors  drive past an image of "What We Do in the Shadows" star Natasia Demetriou in a tunnel.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A child watches as a staff member pours candy through the sunroof of the car.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A staff member holds candy as visitors drive past an installation. 

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A child wearing a mask opens his bag to receive candy.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning parents not to let their children take part in "traditional trick-or-treating where treats are handed to children who go door-to-door."

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A child in a "Slender Man" costume waves from a car's sunroof.

"Attending crowded costume parties held indoors" and "going to an indoor haunted house where people may be crowded together and screaming" are also on the CDC's list of high-risk activities as millions of children gear up for Halloween on Oct. 31.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

Ornaments inspired by Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, decorate a display.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A vehicle drives by an installation of Halloween-themed houses.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

Visitors wearing masks look through their car window.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A performer entertains visitors with a fire dance using artificial lights.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

The fee is $70 per vehicle and the visit lasts 25-35 minutes.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A child holds up a basket to receive candy.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A costumed child sits in a car seat.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

Colorful lights are reflected in a rear view mirror.

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
Image:

A child smiles as she looks away from skeleton figures.

The Week in Pictures: Lakers win one for Kobe and Trump returns to the trail

Kevin Lendio / for NBC News
  • Share
1/17