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Warner Bros. Nixes Dukes of Hazzard Toys With Confederate Flags

by Jacquellena Carrero /  / Updated 

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Warner Brothers announced Wednesday that it would no longer sell products featuring the Confederate flag, becoming the latest in a string of retailers promising to stop selling flag merchandise.

The company confirmed in a statement that it would no longer license production of the General Lee, the iconic orange car from the TV show “The Dukes of Hazzard” that had a Confederate flag painted on its roof.

"Warner Bros. Consumer Products has one licensee producing die-cast replicas and vehicle model kits featuring the General Lee with the confederate flag on its roof — as it was seen in the TV series. We have elected to cease the licensing of these product categories,” Warner Brothers said in the statement released Wednesday afternoon.

Related: Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley Orders Confederate Flag Taken Down From Capitol

But while Warner Brothers is scrapping the image of the flag, one of the stars from “Dukes of Hazzard” isn't giving in: Actor Ben Jones, who played Cooter Davenport, in the show runs an online website that sells merchandise from the show.

He posted his opinion on the shop’s Facebook page, saying, “I think all of Hazzard nation understands that the Confederate battle flag is the symbol that represents the indomitable spirit of independence which keeps us ‘makin’ our way the only way we know how.’”

The move comes a day after South Carolina state officials announced a push to remove the Confederate flag from the state capitol building.

Retail giants eBay, Amazon, and Walmart also said they would ban sales of the Confederate flag and merchandise showing the flag’s image earlier this week.

Outcry over various displays of Confederate iconography was sparked by the attack on a historically black church in Charleston last week.

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