Flashback: Candidates Obama and Clinton March in Selma (2007)

Democratic presidential candidate Barak
Selma, UNITED STATES: Democratic presidential candidate Barak Obama poses for the press while marching in Selma, Alabama along with presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton (unseen), 04 March 2007. Clinton and Obama marched down the streets of Selma Alabama while recreating a peaceful voting rights march that was violently repressed by Alabama troopers in 1965. Hillary Clinton and Obama took to separate church pulpits here Sunday using the civil rights commemoration to battle for support among the country's crucial black electorate. AFP/Getty Images

FLASHBACK: Presidential candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton crossed campaign paths in Selma on March 4, 2007, the 42nd anniversary of commemorating “Bloody Sunday.”

Clinton, Obama Commemorate Historic Selma March
Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama and fellow Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton and her husband, former president Bill Clinton march with a crowd to the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" Voting Rights march March 4, 2007 in Selma, Alabama.Getty Images
Clinton, Obama Commemorate Historic Selma March
Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) (C) marches with a crowd to the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 1965 Bloody Sunday Voting Rights March March 4, 2007 in Selma, Alabama.Getty Images
Clinton, Obama Commemorate Historic Selma March
Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama (D-IL) marches with a crowd to the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 1965 Bloody Sunday Voting Rights March March 4, 2007 in Selma, Alabama.Getty Images
Clinton, Obama Commemorate Historic Selma March
Presidential candidate (L-R) Senator Barack Obama (D-IL), Congressman John Lewis (D-GA), Presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) and her husband, former president Bill Clinton march with a crowd to the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" Voting Rights march March 4, 2007 in Selma, Alabama.Getty Images
Clinton, Obama Commemorate Historic Selma March
U.S. Congressman Artur Davis (D-AL), Rev. Al Sharpton, Democratic Presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton, U.S. Congressman John Lewis (D-GA) and former President Bill Clinton pray before and induction ceremony of National Voting Rights Museum Hall of Fame following a march to the Edmund Pettus Bridge to commemorate the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" Voting Rights march March 4, 2007 in Selma, Alabama. Bill Clinton was one of the inductees into the hall.Scott Olson / Getty Images
US Democratic presidential hopeful Sen.
Selma, UNITED STATES: US Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Barak Obama (L) smiles at the crowd with former US president Bill Clinton 04 March 2007 in Selma, Alabama, at a ceremony where Clinton was inducted into the Voting Right Museum Hall of Fame. Obama spoke earlier at the historic Brown Chapel AME Church, while fellow Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton took to the pulpit of another church using the civil rights commemoration to battle for support among the country's crucial black electorate.AFP/Getty Images

Barack Obama spoke at Brown Chapel AME Church where the march began on March 7, 1965, while Hillary Clinton also spoke in Selma at a church three blocks away, with Bill Clinton present. Three days before the march anniversary, her campaign announced that the former president would accompany her for his induction into Selma’s Voting Rights Hall of Fame.

Clinton and Obama both appeared outside Brown Chapel for a pre-march rally, but came from opposite sides of the podium and did not interact. Despite the intense rivalry between their campaigns, the two praised each other. However they did not join arms when the commemorative march attended by thousands got under way.

Instead, Clinton held hands with her husband in their first joint appearance on the 2008 trail. Obama was several people down the line, his arms linked with the Rev. Joseph Lowery, who led the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery march at the request of Martin Luther King Jr.

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