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Sexual Misconduct: A Growing List

Woman Says Elder President Bush Groped Her as a Teenager

A sixth woman has come forward to accuse former President George H.W. Bush of groping in years past — in this case, when she was 16 and had her picture taken with him in Texas.

Roslyn Corrigan told Time magazine that she met Bush in 2003 when he spoke at a CIA office in The Woodlands, near Houston, where her father worked. The attendees were permitted to pose with Bush for a photo opportunity.

A picture provided to the magazine by Corrigan shows her standing next to Bush, who was 79 at the time, with her mother on his left side.

"As soon as the picture was being snapped on the one-two-three, he dropped his hands from my waist down to my buttocks and gave it a nice, ripe squeeze, which would account for the fact that in the photograph my mouth is hanging wide open," said Corrigan, now 30. "I was like, 'Oh my goodness, what just happened?'"

"My initial reaction was absolute horror. I was really, really confused," she told Time. "What does a teenager say to the ex-president of the United States?"

Corrigan's mother, Sari Young, confirmed Monday to NBC News her daughter's remarks. Other friends also spoke with Time to say that Corrigan had told them what happened.

Related: Here's a Growing List of Men Accused of Sexual Misconduct Since Weinstein

Young declined to comment further, referring questions to lawyer Gloria Allred's office.

Corrigan told Time that she was emboldened to share it publicly after other women in recent weeks said they were inappropriately touched by Bush in similar public settings.

In a now-deleted Instagram post last month, actress Heather Lind accused Bush of touching her from behind and telling her a "dirty joke" during a 2014 Houston screening of her AMC show, "TURN: Washington's Spies."

Actress says former President George H.W. Bush 'sexually assaulted' her 0:47

Lind wrote that a security guard told her she shouldn't have stood next to him. Bush, who is now 93, has been in a wheelchair for about five years, and his spokesman, Jim McGrath, previously explained that his arm might fall at people's waists and that he sometimes pats "women's rears" and tells them "good-natured jokes" to put them at ease.

Four other women have since shared similar stories of being touched. Two of those women, along with Corrigan, say the incidents occurred when Bush wasn't in a wheelchair.

McGrath, in a statement to Time also provided to NBC News, said that in regard to Corrigan: "George Bush simply does not have it in his heart to knowingly cause anyone harm or distress, and he again apologizes to anyone he may have offended during a photo op."

Corrigan said the fact that she was a child at the time "goes beyond a guy being inappropriate in the workplace to a peer or somebody in his age range."

The accusations against Bush come during wider fallout for prominent figures in the entertainment industry and the world of politics because of women sharing stories of being sexually harassed or assaulted.