Subscribe to Breaking News emails

You have successfully subscribed to the Breaking News email.

Subscribe today to be the first to to know about breaking news and special reports.

Eagle-Eyed NASA Mars Probe Celebrates 10 Years at Red Planet

by Mike Wall, Space.com / / Source: Space.com

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

A NASA Mars spacecraft celebrates a major milestone today — a decade circling the Red Planet.

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) arrived at the Red Planet on March 10, 2006 and has done yeoman's work in the decade since. To mark the occasion, NASA created this video celebrating the MRO's 10 years at Mars .

MRO images Mars in unprecedented detail, and its observations have helped researchers keep tabs on the dynamic planet. MRO is also responsible for a number of important discoveries over the years —including the recent determination that water flows seasonally on some parts of modern-day Mars.

Read More: Mars Shows Strong Signs of Flowing Water, Researchers Say

"This mission has helped us appreciate how much Mars — a planet that has changed greatly over time — continues to change today," MRO project scientist Rich Zurek, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said in a statement.

To date, MRO has sent 264 terabits of scientific data back to Earth — more than all other interplanetary missions in history put together, NASA officials said. Some of the probe's observations help researchers evaluate possible landing sites for future robotic and human missions, and others aid route planning for NASA's two operational Mars rovers, Opportunity and Curiosity.

MRO also serves as a vital communications link between these two rovers and their handlers on Earth. (The agency's Mars Odyssey orbiter also provides this relay service.)

Read More: NASA Delays Mars InSight Lander Mission to 2018

The $720 million MRO mission launched on Aug. 12, 2005, tasked with, among other things, studying Martian geology and climate and searching for evidence that Mars has ever hosted liquid water for long periods of time — long enough to potentially provide a habitat for life.

This is a condensed version of a report from Space.com. Read the full report. Follow Mike Wall on Twitter @michaeldwall and Google+. Follow Space.com@Spacedotcom, Facebook or Google+.

Read More from Space.com

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.
MORE FROM news