Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

Next month, the World Wide Web turns 25 years old. (Yes, you are getting older). First proposed by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989, the Web drastically increased the number of people on the Internet.

Now, the Pew Research Center is taking a look back with its report “The Web at 25.” It’s filled with interesting tidbits about how Americans viewed technology in the past — in 1995, 42 percent of them had never heard of the Internet — and how they view it now. Here is a look at the country’s relationship with the Internet today.

90 percent: Americans who think that the Internet has been a good thing for them personally.

$75,000: Income level were Internet usage almost becomes ubiquitous. A full 99 percent of Americans who report this much household income are on the Web.

28 percent: Landline telephone owners who would find it “very hard” to give up their phones. That is a big drop from 2006, when 48 percent of landline owners struggled with the idea of giving up their phones.

11 percent: The gap between those who would find it “very hard” to give up the Internet (46 percent) and television (35 percent).

58 percent: Americans who own a smartphone.

3-to-1: Ratio of Internet users who think that social media strengthens their relationships versus those who think it weakens them.

76 percent: Internet users who say the people they witness or encounter online are “mostly kind” to each other.