Kaspersky Says Iran Talks Spyware Masqueraded Under Foxconn Name

by Reuters /

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.

Further research into the sophisticated computer virus used to hack into hotels where the Iran nuclear talks took place has found it took advantage of digital credentials stolen from the world's top contract electronics maker Foxconn.

Russian security company Kaspersky Lab said on Monday that researchers learned the Duqu 2.0 virus had redirected computer traffic by using a legitimate digital certificate from Taiwan's Hon Hai, also known as Foxconn.

Foxconn customers have included many of the world's biggest electronic makers, including Apple, Blackberry, Google, Huawei and Microsoft.

Kaspersky revealed its initial findings in a report last week in which it said it found the virus in conferencing equipment at three European hotels used in talks involving Iran and six world powers, among other targets.

Digital certificates are the credentials which identify legitimate computers on a network. They act as the basis of e-commerce and other largely automated transactions on the Web.

Read More: Hackers Used Computer Virus to Spy on Iran Nuclear Talks: Security Firm

Kaspersky said it had notified Foxconn of the stolen credentials. Foxconn was not immediately available to comment on steps it has taken to secure its systems.

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.
MORE FROM news