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Twitter Will Soon Let You Squeeze More Into a Tweet

by Alyssa Newcomb /
The social media app Twitter appears on a smartphone in front of a binary background.Jaap Arriens / Zuma Press

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Twitter will soon make it easier for users to squeeze more into a 140-character tweet by relaxing the rules of what counts toward that number, according to a report Monday.

The new, longer tweets feature will be rolled out on September 19, according to The Verge. A Twitter representative declined NBC News' request for comment.

Under the new rules, Twitter will no longer count usernames in replies and media attachments, including polls, photos, videos and GIFs, as part of a user's 140-character limit.

Related: When Will Twitter Get Over Its Identity Crisis?

The change was first announced in May, however Twitter's team didn't reveal when it would take effect.

"We’re exploring ways to make existing uses easier and enable new ones, all without compromising the unique brevity and speed that make Twitter the best place for live commentary, connections, and conversations," the blog post said.

The announcement came after speculation the company may be going a drastically different direction, allowing users to potentially write tweets as long as 10,000 words, according to some reports.

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