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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified on antitrust issues

The Federal Trade Commission opened its antitrust investigation into Facebook in June 2019 amid growing concerns over the social network's power and a string of acquisitions.
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies remotely during a House Judiciary subcommittee on antitrust on Capitol Hill on July 29, 2020.Mandel Ngan / AP

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Federal Trade Commission earlier this week as part of an investigative hearing into antitrust concerns surrounding the social network, a representative for the company said Thursday.

The testimony, which was conducted remotely and took place over two days, came as Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple have faced scrutiny in Washington over how they use their market power. The CEOs of all four companies appeared before a House Judiciary subcommittee last month.

Politico first reported Zuckerberg's testimony. Hearings conducted as part of ongoing FTC investigations are not held publicly.

Facebook spokesperson Andy Stone declined to share details of the testimony, but said the company was "committed to cooperating with the U.S. Federal Trade Commission’s inquiry and answering the questions the Agency may have."

The FTC opened its antitrust investigation into Facebook in June 2019 amid growing concerns over the social network's power and a string of acquisitions, including Instagram, that critics argue have stifled competition.

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In last month's House Judiciary hearing, Zuckerberg defended his company's practices and instead sought to direct the lawmakers' scrutiny onto other tech firms.

"The most popular messaging service in the U.S. is [Apple's] iMessage," Zuckerberg said. "The fastest-growing app is TikTok. The most popular app for video is YouTube. The fastest growing ads platform is Amazon. The largest ads platform is Google. And for every dollar spent on advertising in the U.S., less than 10 cents is spent with us."

While it is customary for top executives to be interviewed in federal investigations, the FTC's decision to question Zuckerberg is particularly notable because it had neglected to interview him in a previous investigation surrounding the Cambridge Analytica scandal.