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Samsung OLED TV will let two viewers watch two shows at once — in full HD

It's a trick of the technology: TVs based on organic light emitting diode tech, a.k.a. OLED, are 1,000 times faster than today's LCD TVs. It's so fast that it can show two different shows to two different people — at full 1080p resolution — simply by flickering back and forth between them. It's kinda like how 3-D works now: You wear special glasses, and the TV shows your left-eye view, then
On the left, it's a football game; on the right, it'sWilson Rothman / NBC News

It's a trick of the technology: TVs based on organic light emitting diode tech, a.k.a. OLED, are 1,000 times faster than today's LCD TVs. It's so fast that it can show two different shows to two different people — at full 1080p resolution — simply by flickering back and forth between them. 

It's kinda like how 3-D works now: You wear special glasses, and the TV shows your left-eye view, then your right-eye view, and back again. Only there can be issues: Some 3-D types only manage half resolution, others can have problems like "cross talk," images that leak from one view to the other.

Take it one step further: One entire show can be sent to a person wearing glasses that both show the "left-eye view," and another entire show can be sent to the person wearing the "right-eye view." Both people who violently hate each other's programming can be happy, especially since the glasses that Samsung promises will have earbuds. (They will not, as far as we know, also include a coupon for marital counseling — but maybe, with this rig, you finally won't need it.)

This is a statement to the power of OLED, and will be awesome when it arrives. But while LG has promised to bring its 55-inch OLED TV to the U.S. for $12,000 starting in March, Samsung won't tell us when OLED will be a commercial reality anywhere in the world.

When NBC News asked H.S. Kim, head of Samsung's display division, what the hold up was, he cited the tremendous expectations consumers have for OLED. The company wants to get it right before it ships, and while it is improving, it's not ready. 

When the TV finally hits the market, expect it to be in the same price range as LG's. In other words, that MultiView may go a ways in helping smooth over any lingering incompatibilities with your mate ... but spending that much on a TV probably won't. Either way, we'll keep you posted when it launches.

Wilson Rothman is the Technology & Science editor at NBC News Digital. He'll be at the Consumer Electronics Show through Friday in Las Vegas, so feel free to tweet him up at @wjrothman, and join our conversation on Facebook.