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    Illinois shooting victims sue gun maker, gunman and retailers

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  • Paradise Lost: Paradise Lost: The Weight of Gold

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  • NYPD search for suspect accused of groping seven women while on moped

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  • Remains of Virginia teen missing since 1975 identified

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  • Uber drivers fear they might be unwitting drug mules

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  • Woman charged with first-degree attempted murder for pushing 3-year-old nephew into Lake Michigan

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  • Viral video appears to show mob of teenagers robbing a Wawa

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  • Texas girl hospitalized after allegedly shooting father in murder pact made with friend

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  • Florida sheriff's deputy killed on interstate after being struck by front-end loader

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Could thieves crack PIN codes stolen from Target?

03:12

After a massive data breach of debit and credit cards for 40 million Target customers, the retail giant revealed Friday hackers had also stolen encrypted personal identification numbers – the company insists that data can’t be unlocked, but some security experts say there’s still reason to worry. NBC’s Gabe Gutierrez reports.