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    OperaCréole brings lost opera pieces by Black composers to American stages

    06:25
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OperaCréole brings lost opera pieces by Black composers to American stages

06:25

Once banned from opera houses during the Jim Crow era, rarely-seen works by American composers of color are finally gracing U.S. stages, thanks to two New Orleans-based mezzo-sopranos. In collaboration with Opera Lafayette, OperaCréole plans to stage the full 550-page production of Edmond Dédé’s Morgiane, believed to be the first full opera composed by a Black American and a piece that conductor Patrick Dupre Quigley calls “the most important piece of American music that no one has ever heard.” Priscilla Thompson brings us their story.