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    Exclusive: One Woman’s Story of Escape from Boko Haram

    02:36
  • Ann Curry talks to Bishop Cupich, upcoming Archbishop of Chicago

    17:07
  • Children from Death Train Reunited

    02:21
  • Dep. Foreign Minister: Syria Warned of ISIS Threat for Three Years

    04:54
  • Putin Wants ‘New Empire,’ Ukraine’s Prime Minister Tells Ann Curry

    11:26
  • No Ceilings: Melinda Gates, Hillary Clinton team up on women’s health, education

    04:48
  • Facing sobering predictions about Ebola epidemic, Melinda Gates offers hope

    04:18
  • ‘Unimaginable’ suffering: Fight against ISIS may worsen refugee crisis

    03:41
  • Iran's president Hassan Rouhani speaks to NBC's Ann Curry in an exclusive interview

    52:37
  • Iran's Rouhani: U.S. Coalition Against ISIS is 'Ridiculous'

    01:17
  • Living on a Dollar a Day: Reality of Extreme Poverty Revealed

    03:17
  • Love and Loss: A Family's Struggle with Childhood Cancer

    03:23
  • Pair Rescues Dozens of Children From Deadly Superstition

    02:49
  • Surviving the Valley of Death: Hope for Ethiopia’s Children

    15:40
  • On Thin Ice: Inuit way of life vanishing in Arctic

    25:42
  • Archbishop Desmond Tutu: Oppression of gays is 'new Apartheid'

    02:47
  • 'Crime of our times': 51 million flee conflict and persecution

    04:58
  • Photographer documents every major war over 40 years

    04:11
  • From Bullets to Ballet: Conflict Photographer Has Epiphany

    03:36
  • Maya Angelou: 'It takes courage to be kind'

    08:50

Scientists warn ocean food supply may be impacted by rising CO2

03:24

Marine biologists are searching for evidence of what our oceans will look like if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. Thirty percent of the carbon dioxide, or CO2, released into the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean, leading to a process called acidification. Shellfish and coral reefs are particularly impacted, according to Jason Hall-Spencer of Plymouth University. "We've never put this much carbon dioxide into the ocean before," he said. "It's never happened before in Earth's history. Not this quickly." NBC's Ann Curry reports.