BABIES
Stefano Paltera  /  AP
Dr. Kathryn Shaw holds the quadruplets, two boys and two girls who were born to Angela Magdaleno in Los Angeles.
updated 7/13/2006 3:44:12 PM ET 2006-07-13T19:44:12

After delivering triplets three years ago, Angela Magdaleno thought she was done having babies. She was wrong four times over.

Magdaleno gave birth to quadruplets on July 6 by Caesarean section. She now has nine children.

The latest additions — two girls and two boys — were doing well Wednesday, while their mother, resting at home, said: “I’m happy because they’re healthy and so am I.”

Still, Magdaleno, 40, worried she might be overwhelmed with the work and sometimes struggles with mixed emotions about the future.

“I don’t know if I’m sad or happy,” she said. “I’m happy but, I don’t know. I don’t know how to explain it.”

Three years ago, Magdaleno gave birth to the triplets after undergoing in vitro fertilization. She said her husband wanted many children. After their birth, she thought she was done having babies.

Then she got pregnant with the quadruplets. Magdaleno said she was shocked at the news.

“She wanted to run,” said her husband, Afredo Anzaldo, 45, who lays carpet for a living.

Her doctor, Kathryn Shaw, a high-risk pregnancy specialist, said Magdaleno did well during the pregnancy and developed no complications.

The babies were born at 32 weeks — well beyond the 29-week average for quadruplets. At birth, the girls were 4 pounds and 17 and 17.5 inches long; the boys about 3.5 pounds and 16 inches long.

One in 800,000
Shaw said the odds of conceiving quadruplets without fertility drugs are about one in 800,000. She’s seen only one other case of quadruplets being conceived without drugs — 18 years ago.

  1. Don't miss these Health stories
    1. Splash News
      More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be?

      Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring.

    2. Larry Page's damaged vocal cords: Treatment comes with trade-offs
    3. Report questioning salt guidelines riles heart experts
    4. CDC: 2012 was deadliest year for West Nile in US
    5. What stresses moms most? Themselves, survey says

Even more rare, the boys appear to be identical twins, according to their doctor, Soha Idriss, who expects the babies will join their mother at home in about eight weeks.

As of Wednesday, their parents were still deciding what to name them.

When the quadruplets come home, Magdaleno will have help from two older daughters.

All 11 family members will be living in a one-bedroom apartment in east Los Angeles. She said the living room is large, but she isn’t sure what the family will do when the babies get bigger.

When the older girls are at school and her husband is at work, a friend has offered to help with the newborns and the triplets. “It’s a lot of work,” their mother said.

In the hospital, the babies sleep wrapped in blankets and attached to monitors and wires in separate incubators. They have full heads of straight dark hair and plump pink mouths.

Anzaldo took the couple’s triplets to White Memorial Medical Center to meet their new brothers and sisters and to let Magdaleno get some rest at home.

They have accepted their new brothers and sisters, Magdaleno said. But at first the triplets weren’t sure if they wanted the extra siblings, Anzaldo said.

“They wanted one baby and no more,” he said.

© 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Discuss:

Discussion comments

,

Most active discussions

  1. votes comments
  2. votes comments
  3. votes comments
  4. votes comments