Karel Prinsloo  /  AP file
U.S. soldiers walked past prison cells at the Abu Ghraib prison just outside Baghdad in September.
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This article drew a variety of responses, with, perhaps not surprisingly, a larger percentage of writers with miliary backgrounds than we usually see in the mailbag.  Some writers expressed frustration with having to show any leniency to POWs, others saw maltreatment of POWs as a metaphor for U.S. aggression.  Interestingly, most of the respondents who identified themselves as members of the military were critical of the soldiers, expecting better behavior from them.

Re: Reported abuse of prisoners in Baghdad to be investigated

Name: Marianne
Hometown: Rensselaer, NY

As far as I am concerned, they should not be abusing the prisoners of war. If they were one of our siblings we would not want them to be abused. What is our reason for being over there? We are there because of Sadamm's abuse of his people so what gives us the right to abuse them.
The Geneva conventions is meant for ALL not just the American people. Abuse of any human being should not be tolerated by any means.

Name: Chris
Hometown: Northridge

Did The Human Rights Group Amnesty Internation forget about 9/11? That they are our enemies.  That families lost their fathers,sons, brothers, daughters, husbands overseas? These priosners of war are just that.. priosners!  They are treated far better than any of our troops were ever treated when held.  I think The Human Rights should go over to Irag and concentrate on how our troops were treated when held.  Fight for right for Americans!! NOT OUR ENEMIES!!!!

Name: Norm Wilson
Hometown: Alpine TX

I think Amnesty International and all these other Communist Organizations should be expelled from Iraq until the country is under control and these insurgents and terrorists stop killing American Soldiers, and their own civilians.  The whole country of Iraq isn't worth the blood of one American Soldier, but we're there, and we need to finish the job.

Name: Sgt. V.
Hometown: fort carson
I've been in Iraq since the start and sometimes it is hard to be nice to the people that just moments before their capture blew the man that was your friend away.  We all have the want to seek vengance.  We also have to remain professional.  It's very hard to do so.  Godspeed.

Name: Donnie Ross
Hometown: Chillicothe Ohio
I wonder if you consider car bombs, suicide bombs, or IEDs inhumane.  You make them sound like patriotic acts by Iraqis.  However, a GI booting some one in the tail to force them to give info is cruel.  After 9/11 the gloves should be off.  We are the only nation who has ever followed the Geneva convention so it is null and void.

Name: Major Jackson C. Stevens, USA (ret.)
Hometown: Tallahassee, Florida
Regarding "Reported abuse of prisoners in Baghdad to be investigated," I believe that it is VITALLY IMPORTANT that the U.S. military take quick, firm, and decisive action to deal with any abuse by U.S. service personnel -- anywhere in the world.  As soldiers, we are trained and committed to treat all people (prisoners, noncombatants, and enemy soldiers) humanely and with respect.  This is not only morally and legally proper, it is also good business.  As a veteran of two years of combat, I know the value of treating all people with respect.  As soldiers, we are ambassadors as well as guardians and our words and actions reflect on our nation as well as ourselves.  THERE IS NO EXCUSE OR JUSTIFICATION FOR PRISONER ABUSE!!!

Name: Chard  R.  Craig, SFC, US Army, Retired
Hometown: Florence, Texas
Re Reported abuse of prisoners.  Three Army reservists discharged, with less than honorable conditions.  I would like to know where the officer in charge was?  Not doing his job is a good guess.  Army Reservists do not have the proper training to be put in that situation.  The UCMJ pertains to enlisted only.  Officers are seldom, if ever, punished to the extent of enlisted.  I know an Army Major charged with Conduct Unbecoming, Conduct to bring Discredit and Disgrace, Wrongful Co-habitation, and Adultry. Confirmed by a Article 32 hearing. He received a written reprimand and was allowed to finish his time and retire. He was married and having an affair with an enlisted man's wife while the enlisted man was overseas.  I was the enlisted man and you can use my name. If you want you can contact me for the full story. The double standard of the UCMJ needs to end. The law pertains to everyone in uniform and that includes officers.

Name: Sam
Hometown: New York

Since U.S. is above the International law, I wonder if we will ever know the truth about abuses by U.S. forces.  Not surprisingly, civilian deaths and the circumstances are never discussed, all those killed are lumped together as insurgents and a few hundred dollars paid to victims family are considered fair compensation for all the abuses. 
The same American leaders complain about human rights abuses by everyone else, but they are blind to abuses against muslims, arabs and those who oppose them.  I truly believe the U.S. administration's attitude is frankly racist, based upon belief that they are superiors, American and israeli (and allied) lives are more precious and all those who resist are uncivilized, terrorists and idiots!

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