Photos: Iran elections

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  1. Iranian Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani, top, looks at judiciary chief Mahmoud Hashemi Shahrudi, right, as he embraces Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad after he was sworn in for a second four-year term during a ceremony in parliament in Tehran on August 5, 2009. Ahmadinejad was sworn in as Iranian president as riot police broke up opposition protests over an election that triggered the worst turmoil in the Islamic republic's history. Framed pictures are portraits of Iranian "martyrs". (Behrouz Mehri / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  2. An Iranian protester holds-up a placard as a burned U.S. flag is seen on the ground during an anti-Britain protest in front of the British embassy in Tehran on Tuesday, June 23. Iran accused U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday of interfering in its state affairs in his comments about the Islamic Republic's disputed June 12 election, the ISNA news agency reported. (Fars News via Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  3. This photograph posted on the internet shows two Iranian women taking cover from a cloud of either tear gas or smoke at an anti-government protest in Tehran, Iran Saturday, June 20. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  4. Supporters of Iranian presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi fight running battles with riot police on Saturday, June 20, in Tehran. Several thousand defied an ultimatum from Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, calling for an end to protests over last week's disputed presidential election results. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  5. A Mousavi supporter holds a toy gun in his hand to intimidate police and militia during Saturday's protests. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  6. Mousavi supporters run from tear gas fired by riot police in Tehran on Saturday. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  7. Iranian protesters cover their face from tear gas during clashes with riot police in Tehran on Saturday. (Ali Safari / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  8. A Mousavi supporter shows her hand covered in the blood of a person injured Saturday. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  9. A protester cheers as a bus burns in Tehran on Saturday. (Ali Safari / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  10. People tend to an injured woman as supporters of Mousavi protest in Tehran on Saturday. (Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  11. Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, front right, leads the weekly Friday prayer at Tehran University. Khamenei called for an end to street protests, siding with declared winner Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, in his first public appearance since the protests began. (Behrouz Mehri / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  12. Khamenei makes his address as part of Friday prayers at Tehran University. He spoke a day after hundreds of thousands of protesters in black and green flooded the streets of Tehran in a somber, candlelit show of mourning for those killed in clashes after Iran's disputed presidential election. (Morteza Nikoubazl / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  13. Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad,left, talks to Judiciary Chief Mahmood Hashemi Shahroodi during Friday prayers in Tehran. (Morteza Nikoubazl / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  14. An Iranian man listens to Khamenei's Friday prayer sermon outside Tehran University on Friday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  15. Iranian men shout slogans outside Tehran University on Friday during the Ayatollah's speech. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  16. Mir Hossein Mousavi, center, acknowledges the crowd during a demonstration Thursday in Tehran where his supporters gathered to honor demonstrators killed in clashes over the disputed election. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  17. Iranian supporters of Mousavi gather in the streets Thursday in Tehran. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  18. Candles are lit for the demonstrators who were killed on June 16. In the background, a slogan that reads 'Death to dictator' is seen on a Tehran street on Thursday. (Ali Zare / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  19. Iranian supporters of defeated opposition presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi demonstrate Wednesday, June 17, in Tehran, Iran. Thousands of people are protesting in the streets of Tehran today with expectations of an even larger protest Thursday as a day of mourning is planned for the eight people killed in Monday's protests. Iran has banned foreign media from covering rallies in the country. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  20. Iranian supporters of defeated reformist presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi demonstrate on June 17, 2009 in Tehran, Iran. Iran's Guardian Council reportedly said that they would recount some of the votes in presidential election that critics say was unfairly won by Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinehjad. (Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  21. A broken computer monitor in a room in a Tehran University dormitory after it was attacked by militia forces during riots in Tehran, Monday, June 15, Iran. Overnight, police and militia stormed the campus at the city's biggest university, ransacking dormitories and arresting dozens of students angry over what they claim was election fraud. Iran's media clampdown seeks to restrict what its citizens and the world can see of street protests. But it's the Internet age, and protesters can take video and photos with cellphones and transmit them over the Web - a huge change from the primitive communications during Iran's 1979 revolution. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  22. A demonstrator shows a picture of former presidential candidate Mirhossein Mousavi during a rally in support of Mousavi near the Azadi (Freedom) monument, western Tehran on Monday. (Caren Firouz / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  23. Demonstrators stand on railings to get a view of the crowds, next to posters of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, as hundreds of thousands of supporters of leading opposition presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi, who claims there was voting fraud in Friday's election, turn out to protest the result of the election at a mass rally in Azadi square in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 15. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  24. A man wounded by gunfire is removed from an area where pro-government militia were firing shots in the air near a rally supporting leading opposition presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi in Tehran, Iran, Monday. Hundreds of thousands gathered in Azadi (Freedom) square in Tehran to support Mir Hossein Mousavi, who claims there was voting fraud in Friday's election. (Ben Curtis / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  25. Defeated Iranian presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi, center, addresses supporters as he attends a rally with his wife Zahra Rahnavard in Tehran on Monday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  26. A man lies on the back of a taxi, after being seriously injured by gunfire in an area where pro-government militia were firing shots in the air at a rally supporting leading opposition presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi in Tehran, Iran, Monday. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  27. Protestors set fires in a main street in Tehran, Iran early on Monday morning. Iran's supreme leader ordered an investigation into allegations of election fraud on Monday. (AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  28. Iranian plain clothes policemen beat a demonstrator with batons during a protest against the election results in Tehran on Sunday. (AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  29. Supporters of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad cry as he addresses them during a victory celebration on Sunday. (Damir Sagolj / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  30. President Ahmadinejad on Sunday holds his first news conference after Iran's controversial presidential election on Friday. (Damir Sagolj / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  31. Mousavi supporters try to calm fellow demonstrators as they clash with a riot policeman in Tehran on Saturday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  32. Smoke billows from a burning bus as a supporter of Mousavi flashes the victory sign during a protest in Tehran on Saturday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  33. Iranian riot police clear burning debris as supporters of the defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi fought running battles using stones and petrol bombs against police on Saturday. (Ben Curtis / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  34. A Mousavi supporter hurls a stone at an Iranian police officer during riots on Saturday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  35. An injured Mousavi supporter covers his face during riots in Tehran on Saturday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  36. An Iranian riot-police officer sprays tear-gas at a Mousavi supporter, who is advancing with a stick on Saturday. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  37. Ahmadinejad supporters flash the victory sign during celebrations in the Shiite holy city of Qom, about 70 miles south of Tehran, on Saturday. (Amir Hesami / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  38. Supporters of the reformist candidate protest the declaration of victory for Ahmadinejad on Saturday. Their preferred candidate, Mousavi, denounced the results as "treason." (Ben Curtis / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  39. Anna Seyedan casts her vote for president of Iran as her daughter Sameen watches on Friday at a polling place in Potomac, Md., for Iranian citizens living in the Washington area. Iran was voting on whether to keep hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in power for four more years or replace him with a candidate more open to loosening the country's Islamic restrictions and improving ties with the United States. (Jonathan Ernst / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  40. Iranian women stand in line to cast their votes at Masoumeh shrine in Qum, about 75 miles south of Tehran on Friday. (Kamran Jebreili / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  41. Ahmadinejad holds his passport up as he arrives to cast his ballot during the Iranian presidential election on Friday. (Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  42. Leading challenger Mir Hossein Mousavi holds his inked finger aloft after casting his vote with his wife Zahra Rahnavard. (Ben Curtis / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  43. An Iranian woman casts her ballot in the presidential elections in a polling station in Tehran. (Behrouz Mehri / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  44. Iranian clerics check candidates' list before voting at the shrine of Hazrat-e Massoumeh, granddaughter of Prophet Mohammad, in the city of Qom. (Damir Sagolj / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  45. Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei delivers a speech after casting his vote to elect a new president at his office in Tehran. (Olivier Laban-Mattei / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
  46. A supporter of Ahmadinejad rides a motorcycle featuring a windshield covered with campaign posters during a rally in Tehran on June 10. (Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  47. Zahra Rahnavard, the wife of Mousavi, holds her husband's photograph during a campaign rally in Tehran on June 9. (Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters) Back to slideshow navigation
  48. A supporter of Ahmadinejad displays her hand painted with the Iranian flag at his final election campaign rally in Tehran on June 10. (Ben Curtis / AP) Back to slideshow navigation
  49. Supporters of Mousavi hold a rally in downtown Tehran on Monday, June 8. (Arash Khamooshi / AFP - Getty Images) Back to slideshow navigation
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  1. Behrouz Mehri / AFP - Getty Images
    Above: Slideshow (49) Iran election sparks violence - Iran elections
  2. Image:
    Walter Bieri / AP
    Slideshow (42) Iran election sparks violence - World reaction
  3. Shah Of Persia
    General Photographic Agency / Getty Images
    Slideshow (15) Iran election sparks violence - Iran's perilous path
  4. AP
    Slideshow (5) Iran election sparks violence - Protests: Then and now
NBC, msnbc.com and news services
updated 6/15/2009 7:51:19 AM ET 2009-06-15T11:51:19

The international media have been targeted by Iranian authorities in the aftermath of disputed presidential elections.

On Sunday, Iranian authorities criticized international reporting and took steps to control the flow of information from independent news sources.

The British Broadcasting Co. said that electronic jamming of its news report, which it said began on election day Friday, had worsened by Sunday, causing service disruptions for BBC viewers and listeners in Iran, the Middle East and Europe. It said it had traced the jamming of the satellite signal broadcasting its Farsi-language service to a spot inside Iran.

"It seems to be part of a pattern of behavior by the Iranian authorities to limit the reporting of the aftermath of the disputed election," said Peter Horrocks, the director of BBC World Service in London.

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lashed out at the media shortly after he claimed victory in the election that critics contend was marked by widespread voter fraud. At a news conference Sunday, he accused international media of launching a "psychological war" against the country.

NBC's Richard Engel reported Monday that, in addition to the violent response to street protests, a "quiet crackdown" has snared more than 100 opposition leaders, student activists and journalists, including an NBC reporter. The reporter, who has not been named by the network, was subsequently released.

Street protests in Tehran
Street protests broke out in Tehran and were fiercely battled by anti-riot police.

A range of communications have been disrupted inside Iran since election day, including those which could be used to organize protests.

Iran restored cell phone service Sunday that had been down in the capital since Saturday. But Iranians still could not send text messages from their mobile phones, and the government increased its Internet filtering in an apparent attempt to undercut opposition voices. Social networking sites including Facebook and Twitter were also not working.

Iran's government has not commented on the restrictions but has accused international media of exaggerating the extent of the street protests in Tehran and of trying to destabilize the government.

Iran regulates and monitors the activities of international and independent media operating within its borders, and it closely watches and guides its own internal state media. Many reformist newspapers, magazines and Web sites have emerged in the past decade, but often come under restrictions or are shut down.

International media normally are allowed to work without censorship in Iran, subject to certain rules, such as seeking advance permission to travel to certain locations outside the capital or to interview government officials.

But Iran is more sensitive about news reports or blogs and Internet communications in Farsi, apparently concerned about the effect on its internal political situation.

Clamp-down steps
Video: Vote probe On Saturday, Iranian officials contacted television journalists for The Associated Press in Iran and warned that the government would enforce an existing law banning provision of news video to the Farsi-language services of the BBC and the Voice of America. Both agencies broadcast to Iranians via satellite in their own language.

AP employees then contacted the BBC and VOA to discuss the order.

"It is the AP practice to comply with local laws regarding media. We are nonetheless determined to continue to provide accurate coverage of events in Iran," said AP's Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll.

There were a variety of other clamp-down steps affecting both international and domestic news organizations. For instance, officials telephoned several visiting international journalists with visas to cover the elections and told them that their visas would not be extended after the vote, a courtesy often offered in the past.

Reporters 'prevented from doing their jobs'
Two other international news agencies that operate in Iran, Reuters and Agence France-Press, could not be immediately reached for comment. Neither reported any restrictions on their journalists.

  • A spokesman for the Swedish network SVT, Geronimo Akerlund, said its reporter, Lena Pettersson, had been asked to "leave Iran as soon as possible because the elections are over."
  • Dubai-based news network Al Arabiya said the station's correspondent in Tehran was given a verbal order from Iranian authorities that its office would be closed for one week, said Executive News Editor Nabil Khatib. No reason was given, but the station was warned several times Saturday that it needed to be careful in reporting "chaos" accurately, he said.
  • German television network ZDF said Sunday on air that its reporter in Iran and other reporters were being "prevented from doing their jobs in a massive form." The network said it was unable to show a broadcast feed from the network's correspondent depicting protests.
  • Italian state TV RAI said one of its crews was caught in a street clash. An Iranian interpreter was beaten with clubs by riot police and officers confiscated the cameraman's videotapes, the station said.
  • Within Iran, state-run newspapers carried no news Sunday about the widespread street clashes the day before. But on Sunday, state TV showed some video footage from the two days of protests.
  • A newspaper started by the main reformist candidate, Mir Hossein Mousavi, did not appear on newsstands Sunday. An editor, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation, said the paper, called Kalemeh Sabz or the Green Word, never left the printing house because authorities were upset with Mousavi's statements after the elections.


Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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