Feedback

Consumer Electronics Show 2010

Click to view early scenes from the show.

A Samsung 10-inch e-reader on display at the Samsung exhibit at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas on Saturday. The tablet uses a stylus to allow users to write on the tablet rather than type. Paul Sakuma / AP
An attendee uses Iron Will Innovations glove game controller in front of a video game at CES in Las Vegas on Friday. Iron Will Innovations demonstrated a futuristic-looking black-and-silver glove that replaces a keyboard for PC gaming and lets users control games by touching their fingers together instead. Called the Peregrine, the glove includes five sensors on each finger that replace different keystrokes when touched to the glove's thumb. A magnetic adapter fits onto the back of the glove and plugs into a computer's USB port. Paul Sakuma / AP
A 3-D camera by Fujifilm is shown with 3-D. The big push from TV makers this year is for sets that show 3-D in the home. Fujifilm is betting that people will want to shoot their own 3-D movies and photos as well, and is selling a digital camera with two lenses, set apart as if they were human eyes. The screen on the back of the Finepix Real 3D W1 presents, if you squint a little bit, a 3-D image using a glasses-free technology similar to the old 3-D postcards. Paul Sakuma / AP
Stephen and Sharon Ritter use Inada Sogno massage chairs at the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. CES, the world's largest annual consumer technology tradeshow, runs through January 10 and is expected to feature 2,500 exhibitors showing off their latest products and services to about 110,000 attendees. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
SKM Industries representative Kristopher Dowdell displays the TV Hat which allowes the user total privacy and freedom from glare to watch movies or other content on their iPhone or iPod Touch. Robyn Beck / AFP - Getty Images
A Lenovo IdeaPad U1 Hybrid laptop, which is a laptop and a slate tablet, is displayed during a media preview for the 2010 CES in Las Vegas. The screen’s multi-section display can be used on the go for e-mail, calendars, social networking and RSS readers, or made into a four-section display for photos, music, videos and document viewing and editing. It will be available June 1. Mario Anzuoni / Reuters
CES attendees look a the Audi MMI 3G system, a navigation and entertainment system, in the NVIDIA booth at the CES on Jan. 7. The built-in navigation system features 3-D topography and real-time traffic reporting. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
The new Motorola Backflip smartphone has a reverse flip QWERTY keyboard and touchpad behind the display.The Backflip also has a 5-pixel camera with autofocus and LED flash, video capture and 32 GB of expandable memory, an Android browser and a 3.5-mm headphone jack. Robyn Beck / AFP - Getty Images
A general view of the Samsung booth at the 2010 CES at the Las Vegas Convention Center on Thursday. The world's largest annual consumer technology tradeshow is expected to feature 2,500 exhibitors. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
The Interead Cooler is shown at Interead's exhibit at CES. Paul Sakuma / AP
At CES, Lady Gaga is announced as Polaroid's creative director of a specialty brand of imaging products. The singer and her team are developing prototypes in the "vein of fashion/technology/photography innovation." Mario Anzuoni / Reuters
The QUE e-reader by Plastic Logic is a 8.5-x-11 inch device with a plastic-based shatterproof screen and can be used for office documents as well as books. The QUE can hold up to 75,000 documents. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
Jon Rubinstein, chairman and chief executive of Palm, holds a new Palm Pixi Plus during a news conference at show Thursday. The company also unveiled the Palm Pre Plus. Both phones will be available Jan. 25. Steve Marcus / Reuters
The enTourage eDGe e-book is displayed at CES. The company said the device is the world's first dualbook, combining an LCD touchscreen, right, and an e-ink screen that can be written on with a stylus. It uses Google Android and will be available in this year for an estimated $490. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
Musician Taylor Swift, left, and Sony CEO Howard Stringer speak at the Sony booth at CES in Las Vegas on Wednesday, Jan. 6. Paul Sakuma / AP
Mitsubishi 3-D glasses are shown in front of an 82-inch Mitsubishi Home Theater TV with 3-D-Ready technology at CES. The show is expected to feature 2,500 exhibitors showing off their latest products. Paul Sakuma / AP
CES attendees look on as the iPhone-controlled Parrot Air Drone quadricopterflies overhead during a press event on Tuesday, Jan. 5. The company touts the Drone as the next "killer app" for augmented reality gaming. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
Jack Hora makes final adjustments to the Sharp Multimedia Lounge inside the NBC Universal booth on January 6. CES, the world's largest annual consumer technology tradeshow, kicks off Jan. 7 and runs through Jan. 10. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
A CES attendee wears a Liquid Image Scuba Series HD320 during a media preview for the 2010 International Consumer Electronics Show. Show officials expect about 110,000 attendees. Mario Anzuoni / Reuters
CES attendees wear 3-D glasses while looking at a 3-D video display by Sensio during a press event at the Venetian. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images
Showgoers walk past a Microsoft display before the opening of CES. Show officials expect about 110,000 attendees this year. Robyn Beck / AFP - Getty Images
A worker holds a pencil up to the side of Samsung's new LED 9000 television to show its thickness during a press event on Jan. 6. The TV has built-in 3-D and has a processor that can convert 2-D to 3-D on the fly. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
A Hannspree polar bear television is displayed during a media preview for CES. Mario Anzuoni / Reuters
Toshiba's Scott Ramirez introduces the company's new Cell TV at CES. Ethan Miller / Getty Images
A worker watches a show in 3-D at the Sony booth. Paul Sakuma / AP