Fewer Families Relying on Food Stamps as Economy Improves

A sign displays that a shop accepts Electronic Benefits Transfer, commonly known as Food Stamps, in the GrowNYC Greenmarket in New York City. As the lingering impact of the Great Recession slowly recedes, so are the numbers of American families who rely on government help to put food on the table.
A sign displays that a shop accepts Electronic Benefits Transfer, commonly known as Food Stamps, in the GrowNYC Greenmarket in New York City. As the lingering impact of the Great Recession slowly recedes, so are the numbers of American families who rely on government help to put food on the table. Andrew Burton / Getty Images

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/ Source: CNBC.com

As the lingering impact of the Great Recession slowly recedes, so are the numbers of American families who rely on government help to put food on the table.

After a surge in 2008, government spending on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, has peaked and begun falling, according to an analysis by the research institute Center on Budget Policy and Priorities. So have the number of participants collecting SNAP benefits, known popularly as food stamps.

Sharonton Taylor shows her SNAP card while visiting The Center for Family Resources in Marietta, Ga last year. As the lingering impact of the Great Recession slowly recedes, so are the numbers of American families who rely on government help to put food on the table.Jessica McGowan / Jessica McGowan for NBC News