'28 Days Are Not Enough,' Graphic Artist Draws Unsung Heroes

Bessie Stringfield, "The Negro Motorcycle Queen" 
In the early 1930's and '40's Bessie travelled the United States on a motorcycle and became the first African-American woman to be admitted into the American Motorcycle Association Hall of Fame and the Harley Davidson Hall of Fame.  She was a motorcycle carrier, she was married 6 times, she was just the basic adventurer. Bessie would go on "penny tours" -- she would throw a penny on a map and when it would land on a place, that's where she would go. If she ran out of money she would perform bike tricks at arenas. This was a time when not only were women not allowed to drive motorcycles, but black women were not even really allowed to drive motorcycles.
Bessie Stringfield, "The Negro Motorcycle Queen" In the early 1930's and '40's Bessie travelled the United States on a motorcycle and became the first African-American woman to be admitted into the American Motorcycle Association Hall of Fame and the Harley Davidson Hall of Fame. She was a motorcycle carrier, she was married 6 times, she was just the basic adventurer. Bessie would go on "penny tours" -- she would throw a penny on a map and when it would land on a place, that's where she would go. If she ran out of money she would perform bike tricks at arenas. This was a time when not only were women not allowed to drive motorcycles, but black women were not even really allowed to drive motorcycles. artist Joel C. Gill

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