U.S. homeland security abandons plan for face scans for U.S. citizens

The proposed regulation was slated to be issued in July by U.S. Customs and Border Protection as part of the Trump administration’s regulatory agenda.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer instructs an international traveler to look into a camera as he uses facial recognition technology to screen a traveler entering the United States at Miami International Airport in 2018.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer instructs an international traveler to look into a camera as he uses facial recognition technology to screen a traveler entering the United States at Miami International Airport in 2018.Joe Raedle / Getty Images file

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By Reuters

The Trump administration said Thursday it no longer plans to propose a regulation next year that would require all travelers — including U.S. citizens — to be photographed when entering or leaving the United States.

The proposed regulation was slated to be issued in July by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) as part of the Trump administration’s regulatory agenda. The agency said Thursday after consulting Congress and privacy experts it would not move forward.

“There are no current plans to require U.S. citizens to provide photographs upon entry and exit from the United States. CBP intends to have the planned regulatory action regarding U.S. citizens removed from the unified agenda next time it is published,” the agency said.

Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., credited public pressure with the decision, which he called “a victory for every single American traveler who flies on a plane.”