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6 Speed Reads:What Happens When You Give Today’s Kids a Walkman?

To match Special Report SONY/

Sony's Walkman models, portable cassette players which were produced in 1980's and 1990's are displayed at Sony's history museum in Tokyo February 23, 2012. The biggest challenge facing Sony's incoming chief executive Kazuo Hirai will be how to bridge a divide in his consumer electronics company between the 'fundamentalists", engineers who want to return the company to its orginal ethos of making cool gadgets, and "new-agers" who see the future in content and connectivity. Picture taken February 23, 2012. To match Special Report SONY/ REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (JAPAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS) - RTR2ZVNR Kim Kyung Hoon / REUTERS, file

1. Kids These Days Are Baffled by Cassette Players

Hand them an iPhone and they’d probably put you to shame with their skills. But hand them a cassette player and they won’t even know what it is, or what to do with it. The first Sony Walkman turns 35 this year, so it’s understandable why this group of kids who were born long after the Walkman’s heyday are so perplexed by the object. “What is this?” they wondered. A walkie talkie, a boom box, a phone? After figuring out what the relic is, the kids attempt to use the cassettes. But wait, you have to press buttons? No tap screen? And you need headphones, too? “Do you know how messed up that is!” one outraged boy asked. “I feel bad for people who lived in the 90’s, I really do,” a 9-year-old girl said. At least we have their sympathy.

2. West Point Grads Headed Into Unsure Future

Post-college jitters are setting in for graduates all over the country, but at West Point the atmosphere is particularly anxiety-ridden. For the first time in 13 years, West Point grads are likely headed for peaceful tours of duty -- and in a military where advancement is increasingly based on active combat, graduates are feeling unnerved by their career projections. It also raises the awkward possibility that recent West Point grads with no direct combat experience could be leading men and women who have served in wars. Some argue, as counterterrorism activity continues, peaceful tours will likely not be the West Point norm.

3. Brothers and Survivors

J.P. and Paul Norden became celebrities in their small town after the Boston Marathon bombing. The brothers, who each lost a leg and suffered serious injuries, are telling their dramatic story in a newly-released book, “Twice as Strong: 12 seconds, 2 Brothers and the Marathon that Changed Their Lives.” They reveal the media attention has been, at times, a welcome distraction from last year’s bombing and they are focused on moving forward.

4. 49er Aldon Smith Arrested for Bomb Threat

San Francisco 49ers star Aldon Smith was arrested at LAX airport over the weekend for allegedly threatening that he had a bomb. The 24-year-old was part of a random secondary screening selection when he claimed he had an explosive, police said. Smith already has two other pending criminal cases. One case involves possession of illegal weapons. The other stemmed from a shooting back in 2012. Smith had to leave the 49ers for five games last season to undergo treatment for substance abuse.

5. Teen’s Terror Tweet to American Airlines Backfires

If you needed further proof that you don’t joke with airlines about terror, a Twitter user named “Sarah” sent a threatening tweet to American Airlines, but quickly realized the error of her ways. On Sunday Sarah wrote: “hello my name’s Ibrahim and I’m from Afghanistan. I’m part of Al Qaida and on June 1st I’m gonna do something really big bye.” The airline responded on Twitter and promised to contact the FBI. Sarah swiftly deployed dozens of panicked tweets begging for mercy, claiming she was only a 14-year-old girl making a joke. The exchange went viral in the Twitterverse, and Sarah deleted her account later that day. According to the Rotterdam Police Department’s Twitter account, the Dutch teen has been arrested, while the FBI is staying mum.

6. The Era of Mad Men vs. Today

If you’re a “Mad Men” fan, chances are you’ve fantasized about living the Don Draper lifestyle: well-tailored clothes, swanky penthouse apartments and happy hours that start at noon. But don’t get too caught up in the clouds. The differences between quality of life during the Mad Men era and today are so stark, even Mr. Draper would would be envious. Need proof? It turns out we’re living longer, we’re healthier and some things are actually cheaper - like airfares. Check out all the comparisons here.