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Amanda Knox says new Matt Damon movie 'Stillwater' is profiting off her story

Knox said the film is another example of her story being told for profit. She tweeted: "Does my name belong to me? My face? What about my life?"
Image: Amanda Knox.
Amanda Knox.Paula Lobo / Walt Disney Television via Getty file

Amanda Knox, whose murder conviction in Italy and then acquittal years later drew international headlines, said Matt Damon’s new movie “Stillwater” is profiting off her story without her approval.

“Does my name belong to me? My face? What about my life? My story? Why does my name refer to events I had no hand in?” Knox tweeted Thursday. “I return to these questions because others continue to profit off my name, face, & story without my consent. Most recently, the film #STILLWATER.”

Knox was convicted, and then acquitted, of her roommate Meredith Kercher’s 2007 murder as a student in Italy.

Knox served four years of a 26-year sentence at Capanne Prison near Perugia, Italy, for the murder of Kercher before her conviction was overturned in 2015. She’s written a memoir, “Waiting to be Heard.”

She has a podcast called “Labyrinths.”

Rudy Guede was convicted of Kercher’s slaying after his DNA was found on her body and his footprints were in her blood.

Knox said in several tweets on the topic, how she was wronged in the case by “shoddy police work” and “prosecutorial tunnel vision.” She said that led to the media incorrectly focusing on her. Knox also tweeted how framing a story, and power dynamics in the wake of the Me Too Movement, have a lot of impact.

“I would love nothing more than for people to refer to the events in Perugia as “The murder of Meredith Kercher by Rudy Guede,” which would place me as the peripheral figure I should have been, the innocent roommate,” Knox tweeted.

Knox also invited Damon and the movie’s director, Tom McCarthy, to appear on her podcast.

A representative with the production and distribution company of the film, Focus Features, did not immediately respond to a request for comment Friday afternoon. Focus Features is a subsidiary of NBC Universal.

The film’s website described the movie as a dramatic thriller about an “American oil-rig roughneck from Oklahoma who travels to Marseille to visit his estranged daughter, in prison for a murder she claims she did not commit.”

Diana Dasrath contributed.