Feedback
Nightly News

ICYMI: Tsunami Survivor Reunites With Family 10 Years Later

From a miraculous reunion in Indonesia to the surprising benefits of taking an aspirin a day, these are Nightly News’ most intriguing stories of the week.

‘Miracle’ Reunion

Raudhatul Jannah was just four years old when she was swept away by the disastrous tsunami that struck Southeast Asia in 2004, and her relatives believed her to be among the 230,000 people killed. Nearly a decade later, she was found alive and has been reunited with her family. “God has given us a miracle,” her mother said.

1:59

Dream Come True

“Dateline,” “TODAY,” and “Nightly News” weekend anchor Lester Holt made Jimmy Fallon’s audience swoon when he and brought his musical talents to “The Tonight Show” and played bass alongside the legendary Roots crew.

“I am grateful to The Roots and Jimmy Fallon for helping to fulfill my dream, and will now happily return to my other dream job in the newsroom,” he wrote. Read Lester’s blog about living out his longtime musical fantasy here.

An Aspirin a Day

A new study suggests that taking an aspirin a day may dramatically reduce the risk of some cancers, but there could also be some serious side effects. Dr. Nancy Snyderman discusses what you need to know.

Watergate: Forty Years Later

Forty years ago, Richard Nixon announced he would resign the presidency and became the first American president to do so. Brian Williams looks back at the legacy of President Nixon and the Watergate scandal.

Swinging From Utah Arches

Thrill seekers from all over the world are flocking to one of the most beautiful places in the country to live out a daredevil’s dream. It’s called rope-swinging, and the death-defying craze has turned the ancient arches of Moab, Utah, into extreme swing sets. Should the stunt be allowed?

Train Rescue

In a display of teamwork at its finest, a group of quick-thinking railway passengers rescued a fellow commuter in Perth, Australia, when his leg got jammed between the platform and the 43-ton train. Watch what they did to free him.