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Vatican Abuse Commission Meets Over Sanctioning Bishops

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Image:
Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley arrives for a meeting of a Vatican commission on sex abuse at the Vatican on Feb. 7, 2015. Members of Pope Francis' sex abuse commission have sharply criticized his remarks that it was OK for parents to spank their children, saying there is no place for physical discipline of children and that the commission would be making recommendations to him about protecting kids from corporal punishment.Gregorio Borgia / AP

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VATICAN CITY — A commission advising Pope Francis on how to root out sexual abuse of children by clergy in the Catholic Church is studying sanctions for bishops suspected of cover-ups or of failing to prevent abuse, members said on Saturday. "There have to be consequences," Cardinal Sean O'Malley of Boston, the head of the commission, told a news conference.

Victims groups have been urging the Vatican for years to make bishops more accountable for abuse in their dioceses even if they were not directly responsible for it. O'Malley said the commission, holding its first full meeting since it was established last year, was drafting recommendations for the pope on how to make bishops more accountable, including possible sanctions. "We think we have come up with some practical recommendations," he said, without giving details but adding that they would "hopefully be implemented."

Under current Church law only the pope can dismiss a bishop. On Thursday, Francis ordered bishops the world over to cooperate as a matter of priority with the commission to root out "the scourge" of the sexual abuse even if it unearths new scandals. "There have been far too many cover ups. There have been far too many clergy protected, moved from place to place — this has got to be consigned to history very, very quickly," said commission member Peter Saunders, a British abuse victim.

Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), which has long campaigned for bishops to be held accountable, called O'Malley's comments "insulting and deceptive" to victims and demanded immediate action. "O'Malley knows that the Church has plenty of ways, right now, to respond when bishops are complicit in clergy sex crimes and cover ups. The Pope can oust them," the U.S.-based group said in a statement.

Image:
Cardinal Sean Patrick O'Malley arrives for a meeting of a Vatican commission on sex abuse at the Vatican on Feb. 7, 2015. Members of Pope Francis' sex abuse commission have sharply criticized his remarks that it was OK for parents to spank their children, saying there is no place for physical discipline of children and that the commission would be making recommendations to him about protecting kids from corporal punishment.Gregorio Borgia / AP

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