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    Zelenskyy hosts allies as Ukraine marks 2 years since Russian invasion

    02:22
  • Navy sailor meets newborn daughter for first time in joyful moment

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  • Bodycam and surveillance video show 24 hours before death of 16-year-old Nex Benedict

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  • Georgia community mourning after 22-year-old found dead on UGA campus

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  • U.S. and U.K. conduct airstrikes on Houthi targets in Yemen

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  • NBC News projects Trump wins South Carolina GOP primary

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  • AI chip maker Nvidia's huge rise sparks market frenzy

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  • U.S. military tracks high-altitude balloon over Utah

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  • On second anniversary of war, Ukraine struggles to fight on

    02:11
  • Alabama's attorney general says he will not prosecute IVF families or providers

    03:03
  • U.S. astronaut reflects on longest space mission

    01:35
  • Federal data reveals gun stores whose firearms have been used in many crimes

    03:24
  • Trump far ahead in polls on eve of South Carolina primary

    01:39
  • White House announces new sanctions against Russia after Navalny death

    00:37
  • Suspect arrested in killing of woman on University of Georgia campus

    01:41
  • Former Israeli hostage speaks out about captivity

    02:59
  • Opening statements in 'Rust' manslaughter trial

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  • Biden meets with Navalny's widow, praises the Russian opposition leader

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  • More medical facilities suspend IVF treatment after Alabama embryo ruling

    02:20

Two historically segregated parks in South Carolina become new ‘Unity Park’

01:39

In Greenville, South Carolina, Black children were given a 15-acre patch of land to play on called Mayberry Park in the Jim Crow South. But in 1938, the city split the park in half to create a new whites-only baseball stadium. As decades passed, the parks were not looked after. Greenville’s mayor said the neighborhood became the city’s garbage dump. Pressure began to build from the community to right a historical wrong. Now, with $15 million in donations, the 60-acre Unity Park was born.