June 5 coverage of nationwide unrest and ongoing protests

George Floyd's death has sparked protests across the country. Here are the latest updates.
Image: Protesters lay in the middle of the intersection of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and Second Avenue in Memphis Thursday, June 4, 2020
Protesters lay in the middle of the intersection of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. and Second Avenue in Memphis Thursday, June 4, 2020 for the protests over the death of George Floyd. Floyd died after being restrained by Minneapolis police officers on May 25.Patrick Lantrip / AP

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This live coverage has now ended. Continue reading June 6 coverage of George Floyd's death and the nationwide protests.

Protesters hit the streets in cities across the U.S. for a 10th night in a row just hours after George Floyd’s family condemned the “pandemic of racism and discrimination” at a memorial service.

In Washington D.C., where workers walled off more of the White House complex to keep demonstrators at bay, Metropolitan Police Chief Peter Newsham said the department was preparing for big numbers of “peaceful demonstrators coming to exercise their First Amendment rights” on Saturday.

And in Buffalo, two police officers were suspended without pay after a video showed authorities knocking down a 75-year-old man during a protest, Mayor Byron Brown said.

Download the NBC News app for the latest updates.

Ex-Trump chief of staff John Kelly: 'I agree' with Mattis' rebuke of the president

John Kelly, President Donald Trump's ex-chief of staff, said Friday that he agrees with former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis's scathing critique of the president, but largely avoided direct criticism of his former boss himself.

In an interview with former White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci, Kelly said, "None of us would take making a statement like that lightly, but there is a concern — I think an awful big concern — that the partisanship has gotten out of hand." Kelly added, "He's quite a man, Gen. Jim Mattis, and for him to do that tells you where he is relative to the concern he has for our country."

"I agree with him," Kelly continued. "I think we need to step back from the politics." Referring to the constitutional separation of powers, the former White House chief of staff added, "No president, ever, is a dictator or a king." 

In a statement to The Atlantic magazine published Wednesday, Mattis — like Kelly, a retired four-star Marine general — said Trump "tries to divide us" and abused his executive authority by violating the constitutional rights of demonstrators outside the White House on Monday who were protesting the killing of George Floyd. That's when federal law enforcement forcibly cleared protesters out of the area shortly before Trump used the scene for what Mattis called a "bizarre photo-op" in front of a fire-damaged church. 

Kelly, who was Trump's head of Homeland Security before becoming his chief of staff, said "the end result" of the photo-op was "predictable," but "the jury is still out on tear gas and who got hit." He added, "I would have recommended against it."

Protesters in Maine await President Trump's arrival

A block party vibe in Washington

Reddit co-founder steps down from company's board, urges it be filled by a black candidate

Reddit co-founder and executive chairman Alexis Ohanian stepped down from the company’s board on Friday and “urged them to fill my seat with a black candidate."

Ohanian also committed money made on his Reddit stock "to serve the black community, chiefly to curb racial hate” in his announcement on his official Twitter account. He said his first donation would be to Colin Kaepernick’s racial justice charity Know Your Rights Camp.

“I believe resignation can actually be an act of leadership from people in power right now. To everyone fighting to fix our broken nation: do not stop,” Ohanian wrote on Twitter.

Reddit, the sixth-most visited website in the United States, according to web analytics company Alexa, has been the subject of critique for how it has handled racism on its platform. 

Reddit CEO Steve Huffman released a statement on Monday stating “we do not tolerate hate, racism, and violence, and while we have work to do to fight these on our platform, our values are clear.”

Huffman’s predecessor as CEO, Ellen Pao, tweeted a rebuke to the blog post hours later.

“So much of what is happening now lies at your feet. You don't get to say BLM when reddit nurtures and monetizes white supremacy and hate all day long,” Pao wrote.

The site has struggled in the past to curtail communities devoted to hate speech. In April of 2018, when asked “Is obvious open racism, including slurs, against Reddit’s rules or not?” Huffman responded, “It’s not.”

“On Reddit, the way in which we think about speech is to separate behavior from beliefs. This means on Reddit there will be people with beliefs different from your own, sometimes extremely so,” Huffman said. “When users actions conflict with our content policies, we take action.”

Ohanian and his wife, tennis star Serena Williams, have for years supported charities that help the black community. They have also donated to and hosted events for Black Girls Code dating back to 2014.

D.C. Mayor Bowser has 'Black Lives Matter' painted on street leading to White House

WASHINGTON — District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser on Friday had "Black Lives Matter" painted on the street that leads to the White House where protesters have been demonstrating following George Floyd’s death in police custody.

"There was a dispute this week about whose street this is," John Falcicchio, chief of staff for Bowser, a Democrat, said in a tweet. "Mayor Bowser wanted to make it abundantly clear that this is DC's street and to honor demonstrators who (were) peacefully protesting on Monday evening."

People were seen painting the words "Black Lives Matter" on Friday morning in large block letters in yellow across 16th street, which leads to Lafayette Square and the White House.

The official D.C. chapter of the Black Lives Matter Global Network, however, suggested in a tweet that this move was merely an empty gesture by Bowser.

Read the full story here.

'No child should live through that': Viral protestor Raymon Curry on growing up black

NYC Mayor addresses detainment of essential worker after curfew

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio reiterated Friday that essential workers are exempt from the city's 8 p.m. curfew after a food delivery worker was detained by officers on Thursday night. 

The 8 p.m. curfew began Tuesday and will remain in effect until Sunday. 

A delivery worker on Thursday was cuffed, but not arrested, by officers near Central Park West, according to NBC New York. A journalist who was standing in front of her home was "roughed up" by police the day before, NBC New York reported

De Blasio said it needs to be "abundantly clear" to both the NYPD and essential workers that people "doing their job are exempted from curfew." 

As far as "news media out there doing their job, reporting, looking at the truth," de Blasio said. "Their right to do their job must be protected at all times."

The curfew will remain in effect until Monday morning as originally planned, he said. 

Washington mayor calls for federal law enforcement and military to leave

‘A giant mistake’: Police jeopardized more than protesters’ civil rights with crackdowns

Police advance on demonstrators last Saturday in Minneapolis.Scott Olson / Getty Images

The aggressive police response to demonstrations over George Floyd's death shows that departments have not learned the lessons of earlier protests in Baltimore over the death of Freddie Gray and in Ferguson, Missouri, over the death of Michael Brown, experts said.

The way police in many cities have responded to the recent protests — including clashes in which officers may have violated protesters' civil rights — threatens to jeopardize the limited progress on reforms made over the past several years. 

“I don’t think anyone would agree that police have emerged better off than they were a few days ago,” said Edward Maguire, an Arizona State University criminologist who researches police response to protests. He has seen images of officers beating up protesters and firing tear gas and rubber bullets on crowds in ways that may have made things worse, he said. “They have actively diminished their image over the past few days and it’s a giant mistake for them to have responded in that way.”

Read the full story here.