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Live updates: Trump impeached by the House on both articles

A day after Trump derided the process as a Democratic "crusade," and following hours of debates, the House is set to send both articles to the Senate for trial.
Image: The House of Representatives will vote on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday.
The House of Representatives will vote on two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Wednesday.Chelsea Stahl / NBC News

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The House of Representatives voted on Wednesday to impeach President Donald Trump on both articles of impeachment: abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The vote followed weeks of testimony related to his dealings with Ukraine and hours of fiery debate over the process.

Trump is only the third president in U.S. history to be impeached. Follow us here for all of the latest breaking news and analysis on impeachment from NBC News' political reporters, as well as our teams on Capitol Hill and at the White House.

TRUMP IMPEACHMENT HIGHLIGHTS

Live Blog

 

House chaplain delivers prayer on floor: 'Give them wisdom and discernment'

The Rev. Patrick Conroy, the House chaplain, opened the floor Wednesday at 9 a.m. ET with a prayer in which he asked for guidance for the men and women of the people’s House "as they consider important legislation" and constitutional action. 

“Give them wisdom and discernment,” he said. “Help them to realize that your constituency is wider and broader than ever we could measure or determine.”

“Help them, and help us all to put away any judgments that belong to you and do what we can to live together in harmony,” Conroy added.

House gavels in, votes on GOP motion to adjourn

The House gaveled in at 9 a.m. Rep. Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., chairman of the conservative Freedom Caucus, made a motion to adjourn, which the House is now voting on. Democrats will kill the motion, and then members will begin one hour of debate on the rule for consideration of the articles of impeachment.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has asked Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., to preside over the floor debate as speaker pro tempore, an aide to the speaker said. Pelosi will speak at the opening of general debate and will preside over both votes on the articles of impeachment.

DeGette was chosen for the role because she is a master at presiding, is the Democrats' toughest speaker pro tem and has been preparing for this debate for weeks, a senior Democratic aide said. 

First Read: Impeachment caps a dark and dysfunctional decade in American politics

It’s only fitting that the decade is coming to an end with an impeachment vote against the president of the United States, because it’s been a dark 10 years in American politics.

And it’s gotten progressively worse, especially in the last three years.

Consider this timeline of controversy, gridlock, outrage and resentment in our politics. Add them all up, and it’s easily the darkest decade in politics since the 1960s. And think of anyone in their 20s right now — it’s all they’ve seen.

Get more of First Read here and here.

Schiff condemns Trump's 'lack of morality'

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff,  whose panel led the investigation into Trump's Ukraine dealings at the center of Democrats' abuse of power argument, joked Wednesday that the passage of President Donald Trump's scorched-earth letter that focused on Schiff was "probably the nicest thing" Trump had "to say about me" in some time.

"This president does nothing but project onto others his lack of morality," Schiff, D-Calif., told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" of Trump's Tuesday letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Read more from Schiff's interview here

Trump on impeachment: 'Can you believe...'

 

President Donald Trump expressed disbelief on Twitter ahead of Wednesday's historic vote that the House is set to formally impeach him for his conduct involving Ukraine.

Read the full story here.

Impeachment rewind: What we learned from House Intelligence Committee hearings

From Wednesday Nov. 13 to Thursday Nov. 21, Americans were glued to their televisions, computers and streaming devices, as the House Intelligence Committee held a series of long public hearings as part of a broader Democratic-led impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

Click here for a look back on all the things we learned from two jam-packed weeks of public testimony.

McConnell rejects Democrats' call for new witnesses in a Senate trial

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ripped House Democrats' impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump as the "most unfair" in U.S. history a day ahead of the impeachment vote, rejecting the Democratic minority's call for new witnesses as part of a Senate trial.

"It is not the Senate's job to leap into the breach and search desperately for ways to get to guilty," McConnell, R-Ky., said. 

Also Tuesday, he reporters he would not be an "impartial juror" if an impeachment trial is held in the GOP-led Senate. "I think we're going to get an almost entirely partisan impeachment," he added.

Minority Leader Chuck Schumer had requested that the Senate, during its trial, call former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, as well as two others, to testify about Trump’s Ukraine dealings.

Read more here.

Giuliani boasts of ousting Yovanovitch, reveals more details on what he says he told Trump

Rudy Giuliani, after telling publications that he engineered U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch's ouster because she was an obstacle to investigations desired by his client President Donald Trump, claimed Tuesday that she "needed to be removed for many reasons."

"Yovanovitch needed to be removed for many reasons most critical she was denying visas to Ukrainians who wanted to come to US and explain Dem corruption in Ukraine," Giuliani said on Twitter. "She was OBSTRUCTING JUSTICE and that’s not the only thing she was doing. She at minimum enabled Ukrainian collusion."

Giuliani, the president's personal attorney, was tweeting after two news outlets published interviews with him Monday in which he revealed more details about his involvement in Yovanovitch's abrupt removal from her post, as well as what he says Trump knew.

For the full story click here