Senate, White House reach deal on $2 trillion stimulus plan

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With roughly a third of the world under some form of lockdown, the White House and Senate leaders reached agreement on a landmark $2 trillion stimulus package to combat the economic impact of coronavirus.

The White House coronavirus coordinator asked people who have recently been in New York, where the death toll continues to climb, to quarantine themselves for 14 days, because they may have been exposed before leaving.

President Donald Trump is pushing for the country to get back to business by April 12, Easter Sunday, when he said he would like to see churches full of people. The World Health Organization, meanwhile, has warned that the U.S. could become the pandemic's new epicenter.

And as the number of cases in the U.K. reached 8,000 on Wednesday, Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, was confirmed to have tested positive for coronavirus.

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CORRECTION (March 25, 2020, 12:45 p.m. ET): An earlier version of the headline on this article misstated the status of the federal stimulus plan. The White House and Senate leaders have reached a deal, but the Senate has not yet passed the stimulus plan.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading March 26 Coronavirus news.

Tide of tourists admiring Japan's cherry blossoms turns to trickle

Osaka native Hiroshi Nakajima, 65, gazes at the cherry blossoms in Osaka Park.Cullen Bird

Normally the start of the cherry blossom season in Osaka Castle Park in Osaka, Japan, would be greeted by crowds of tourists walking up the paths and gates to see the its cherry trees in bloom.

But the few tourists seen now are a fraction of the usual crowds, even for a Monday morning, said Yasuyuki Funabiki, a volunteer tour guide with the Osaka Systematized Good-Will Guides Club.

“Only 1 percent,” Funabiki said, comparing the usual crowds to the handful of tourists and locals milling around the summit of the park.

Read the full story here.

Markets barely budge, despite long-awaited passing of massive stimulus plan

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose by just 350 points at Wednesday's opening bell, as investors parsed whether the $2 trillion stimulus package would be able to keep pace with the compounding economic effects of the coronavirus outbreak.

Just one day after the Dow notched its biggest one-day point gain ever in anticipation of the bill's approval, the blue-chip index slumped overnight, falling by 200 points before rallying slightly Wednesday morning.

The S&P 500 and Nasdaq were both up by around 1 percent each.

Arizona mayors slam governor's edict keeping golf courses open

Five different mayors in Arizona sent a letter to Gov. Doug Ducey Tuesday cover his decision to classify some businesses like golf courses as “essential” during the coronavirus pandemic.

The mayors, including of the cities of Tucson and Flagstaff, sent the Republican governor a letter saying his executive order should not have included golf courses and payday lenders in the definition of “essential services” that cannot be shut down in response to the outbreak. They also requested a statewide moratorium on evictions and foreclosures.

Ducey has agreed to pause evictions for 120 days for renters who are quarantining or struggling from the economic fallout.

U.K. launches self-reporting app to track spread of virus

Researchers in the U.K. have launched an app to help track the spread of COVID-19 in order to explore, in real time, who is most at risk. 

The Covid Symptom Tracker app asks participants to take one minute a day to report on whether they feel healthy, and to answer questions on a wide range of symptoms.

Researchers believe the data from the study will reveal important information about the symptoms, and why some people develop more severe or fatal disease while others have only mild symptoms.

Shoppers in India embrace social distancing amid world's largest lockdown

Shoppers in India's Gujurat state were waiting in circles to maintain social distancing as the country began the world's largest lockdown on Wednesday. 

More than 1.3 billion people, or nearly one-fifth of the world's population, have been told to stay inside. 

“To save India and every Indian, there will be a total ban on venturing out,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi said Tuesday night, acknowledging that the 21-day lockdown would be a major blow to the economy but saying that the alternative could set the country back 21 years.

Coronavirus misinformation makes neutrality a distant memory for tech companies

A passenger wearing a surgical mask uses his iPhone on New York City subway on Wednesday, March 18. Robert Nickelsberg / Getty Images

Open up Instagram these days and you might be bombarded with calls to "Stay Home." On YouTube, you may see a link to a government website about the coronavirus. Or go to Twitter and try to find the phrase "social distancing is not effective." It might be there, but probably not for long — because Twitter has banned the phrase as harmful.

A few years ago, these kinds of warnings and filters would have been hard to imagine. Most major consumer technology platforms embraced the idea that they were neutral players, leaving the flow of information up to users.

Now, facing the prospect that hoaxes or misinformation could worsen a global pandemic, tech platforms are taking control of the information ecosystem like never before. 

Read the full story here.

Coronavirus confessions: share your anonymous stories

In time of social distancing, self-isolation and quarantining, NBC News would like to hear from our readers about their experience with COVID-19. 

Our readers can submit their own stories about childcare, family, dating, work and more during the pandemic. 

Check out some confessions and share your own here

Spain's death toll surpasses China

A Spanish soldier stands next to beds set up at a temporary hospital in Barcelona on Wednesday.Pau Barrena / AFP via Getty Images

Spain has surpassed China in nationwide deaths from coronavirus and is now second only to Italy, according to numbers released by the government on Wednesday. 

The country's health officials reported 738 new deaths Wednesday, bringing the total to 3,434.

The outbreak began in China, which on Wednesday reported a total of 3,281 deaths. Italy, Europe's hardest-hit country and the pandemic's current epicenter, has reported 6,820. 

NBA star Karl-Anthony Towns says his mom is in a coma because of coronavirus

Minnesota Timberwolves player Karl-Anthony Towns says his mom is in a medically-induced coma because of coronavirus.

The NBA star announced on social media his mom has been suffering from a high fever, a cough and was having trouble breathing. She was put on a ventilator before being placed in a coma.

Towns encouraged his fans to take the outbreak seriously and said he made the video so "people understand the severity" of the outbreak.

"This disease needs to not be taken lightly. Please protect your family, your loved ones, your friends, yourself, practice social distancing, please don't be in places with a lot of people," he said.

"We're gonna keep fighting," Towns said. "We are gonna beat it, we are gonna win. I hope my story helps."