EVENT ENDED

Senate, White House reach deal on $2 trillion stimulus plan

Here are the latest updates from around the world.

Breaking News Emails

Get breaking news alerts and special reports. The news and stories that matter, delivered weekday mornings.
SUBSCRIBE

With roughly a third of the world under some form of lockdown, the White House and Senate leaders reached agreement on a landmark $2 trillion stimulus package to combat the economic impact of coronavirus.

The White House coronavirus coordinator asked people who have recently been in New York, where the death toll continues to climb, to quarantine themselves for 14 days, because they may have been exposed before leaving.

President Donald Trump is pushing for the country to get back to business by April 12, Easter Sunday, when he said he would like to see churches full of people. The World Health Organization, meanwhile, has warned that the U.S. could become the pandemic's new epicenter.

And as the number of cases in the U.K. reached 8,000 on Wednesday, Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, was confirmed to have tested positive for coronavirus.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

Download the NBC News app for latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak.

CORRECTION (March 25, 2020, 12:45 p.m. ET): An earlier version of the headline on this article misstated the status of the federal stimulus plan. The White House and Senate leaders have reached a deal, but the Senate has not yet passed the stimulus plan.

This live coverage has ended. Continue reading March 26 Coronavirus news.

Live Blog

British neighbors sing 'Happy Birthday' to quarantined child

Neighbors on a British street hung out of windows and stood in gardens to sing "Happy Birthday" in unison to Sophia Thomas as she celebrated turning 8 in quarantine on Wednesday.

The display of community affection in Southampton, southern England, for the child spending her birthday indoors as part of Britain's ongoing lockdown response to the coronavirus was captured and shared online by her father, Rob Thomas, and has now been widely shared online, he said.

"Sophia is blown away, absolutely blown away by it. ... It's all going a bit crazy," he told NBC News.

Sophia's parents put out a request on a neighborhood WhatsApp group for cards and virtual messages to cheer up their daughter and were taken aback when the neighborhood agreed to the sing-a-long.  

New York City crime rates plummet, according to police stats

New Yorkers are staying put and committing less crimes, according to new NYPD statistics. Overall, crime in the city had been on a sharp rise in 2020 compared to last year, but the past week has seen a crash in the number of incidents. 

Citywide crime is down almost 17 percent compared to the same week last year, with dramatic drops in violent crime. Shootings are down 23.5 percent, rapes down 69 percent and assaults down 9 percent. Crime in the subway, which had grown significantly since the start of the year, was down 33 percent last week, compared to the year before.

Criminals are still stealing cars, though. Car thefts were up 52 percent compared to the same week last year.

Astronauts give tips on how to handle isolation

As many people around the globe are adapting and learning to live in confinement, those who have lived as remote as it gets have been offering tips. Astronauts like Scott Kelly, Peggy Whitson and Chris Hadfield have recently shared their advice for isolated living in the age of COVID-19.

Scott Kelly — who lived for nearly a year aboard the International Space Station — wrote in a New York Times opinion piece that he suggested following a schedule, getting a hobby and keeping a journal.

Peggy Whitson, who has spent more time in space than any other American, said that team purpose is crucial when coping with solitude on CBS This Morning. "COVID-19 gives us a higher purpose — much like being in space does — because we are saving lives by quarantining," she said.

Russia’s constitutional vote indefinitely postponed as coronavirus numbers rise

A man wearing a face mask walks in central Moscow on Thursday. Yuri Kadobnov / AFP - Getty Images

Russia's nationwide vote on constitutional amendments slated for April 22 was postponed Wednesday as the number of coronavirus cases in the country surged. 

President Vladimir Putin said the vote has been put off "until a later date" without offering more specifics.

He also announced that next week will be a national paid holiday, with no one but essential personnel going to work. 

"Believe me, the safest thing to do right now is to be at home," Putin added. 

The number of coronavirus cases in Russia surged to 658 on Wednesday, government officials said. 

Trump's businesses barred from bailout money in Senate coronavirus bill

President Donald Trump will not be eligible for any federal assistance for his businesses as part of the coronavirus stimulus package that the Senate agreed upon early Wednesday morning, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said in a letter to Democratic senators summarizing the bill.

In his summary, Schumer said that the bill will include a provision to "prohibit businesses controlled by the president, vice president, members of Congress, and heads of executive departments from receiving loans or investments from Treasury programs."

That measure came out of negotiations on a portion of the bill providing $500 billion in loans to distressed industries. That fund would be under the Treasury Department's control and could include bailout payments to hard-hit businesses like hotels and cruise lines.

Read more here.

Photo: Disinfecting the Pyramids

Workers disinfect the Giza pyramids necropolis on the outskirts of Cairo on Wednesday as protective a measure against the spread of the coronavirus.Khaled Desouki / AFP - Getty Images

Employee at FEMA operations center tests positive

A Federal Emergency Management Agency employee, who works in the agency's operations center at its headquarters in Washington, D.C., has tested positive for COVID-19, according to an internal email obtained by NBC News.

The third floor of the headquarters, where the employee worked, was shut down for cleaning and everyone else was temporarily told to work remotely, according to the email sent Tuesday night. The floor is part of the operations center for the agency's national emergency response to coronavirus. This morning employees were back at work, spacing out their desks. 

Employees who are required to continue working in the office are undergoing temperature screening and implementing social distancing.

In a statement, the agency noted the positive test, saying that "at no time did this individual or any others known to have contact with them, come within six feet of the Vice President or any other Task Force principal for any period of time" during the White House group's visit to the agency headquarters two days ago.

Georgia hospital worker found dead at home with her kid

A 42-year-old hospital worker in Georgia who had coronavirus was found dead in her home with her 4-year-old child by her body.

Diedre Wilkes' body was discovered Thursday in the living room of her home in Newnan, about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta, after a family member called the Coweta County Sheriff's Office requesting a welfare check, the coroner, Richard Hawk, told NBC News on Wednesday.

Read the full story here

Thailand imposes state of emergency to control virus

Thai people wearing protective masks ride through a wholesale market in Bangkok, Thailand on Wednesday. Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP

Thailand's prime minister announced a state of emergency on Wednesday as the country tries to contain the spread of the coronavirus. 

In a nationwide address, Prayuth Chan-ocha said emergency measures will come into force on Thursday and last until at least the end of April.

Chan-ocha said large gatherings will be banned, and people under the age of 5 and over 70 will be asked to stay home.

Public venues including gyms, nightclubs and massage parlors will also be shut down. 

Thailand has so far reported 827 coronavirus cases and four deaths. 

Former Fed chairman sees ‘very sharp’ recession

Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke sounded an optimistic tone on the longer-term state of the economy, predicting in a CNBC interview Wednesday that while the U.S. is facing an acute recession, it shouldn’t last.

“It is possible there’s going to be a very sharp, short, I hope short, recession in the next quarter because everything is shutting down of course,” he said on “Squawk Box.”

“If there’s not too much damage done to the workforce, to the businesses during the shutdown period, however long that may be, then we could see a fairly quick rebound.”

During the financial crisis that exploded in 2008, Bernanke guided the Fed through its efforts to save the economy.

Read the full article here.

Obama: Social distancing needs to stay in place until testing is more widely available

Former President Barack Obama tweeted Wednesday that current social distancing policies need to stay in place until testing for the novel coronavirus is more widespread.

Obama's tweet comes as President Donald Trump has pushed in recent days for the U.S. economy to begin ramping up by Easter.

"These are the burdens our medical heroes already face in NYC," Obama tweeted, linking to a New Yorker magazine story detailing the struggles from inside New York City's stressed hospitals. "It's only going to get harder across the country. Another reason to maintain social distancing policies at least until we have comprehensive testing in place. Not just for our sake — for theirs."

In recent weeks, Obama has made use of his large social media platforms to address the coronavirus pandemic, posting like never before since leaving office. The former president has posted messages promoting safety measures, explained the reasoning behind strong new restrictions to combat the virus and shared stories he finds inspiring of individuals and organizations taking action during the crisis.